“Struggle is normal” – managing your mental health at university

“Struggle is normal” – managing your mental health at university

She has been leading the development of the Greater Manchester University Student Mental Health Service (which had its launch event on Monday …
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Psychologists debunk 25 mental-health myths

Following is the transcript of the video. Laura Goorin: So, the myth that all neat freaks have OCD …
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The Importance of Community and Mental Health

Mental health heavily influences our quality of life. So it makes sense that mental health, just li…
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Aria – Jefferson Health

Aria – Jefferson Health

Aria – Jefferson Health one of the leading hospitals in Philadelphia offering Cancer Center, Center for Gynecology and Women’s Health and the …
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County Health Departments

County Health Departments. County Health Department Phone Numbers. County Health Department Phone Numbers …
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Hertfordshire #JustTalk campaign encourages St Albans pupils to talk about mental health

PUBLISHED: 15:30 19 November 2019 | UPDATED: 15:30 19 November 2019 Anne Suslak The #JustTalk campa…
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For better health care, embrace irrationality

For better health care, embrace irrationality

TED.com translations are made possible by volunteer translators. Learn more about the Open Translat…
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Conversations about life’s final chapter

Have you ever sat down with a relative or close friend to talk about what would happen if either o…
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Effect of exercise referral schemes upon health and well-being

Methods Data were obtained from 23 731 participants from 13 different ERSs lasting 6 weeks to 3 months. Changes from pre- to post-ERS in health …
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Is plastic a threat to your health?

Is plastic a threat to your health?

Plastic is everywhere. It’s in bowls, wraps, and a host of bottles and bags used to store foods an…
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Too much vitamin D may harm bones, not help

What can we help you find? Enter search terms and tap the Search button. Both articles and products…
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70 is the new 65, government statisticians say, thanks to delay in onset of ill health

R etirement, pension and free flu jabs – everything those entering into the world of sexagenarians …
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Health Secretary Jeane Freeman will not rule out intervention over scandal-hit Glasgow hospital

Health Secretary Jeane Freeman will not rule out intervention over scandal-hit Glasgow hospital

Health Secretary Jeane Freeman will not rule out intervention over scandal-hit hospital Scotland&rs…
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40 Carrie Underwood-Approved Health Habits You Can Definitely Steal

Carrie Underwood has been bringing her health and fitness A-game since practically forever, and it …
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Raising awareness of oral health care in patients with schizophrenia

Raising the profile of oral health in the care of people with severe mental illness, such as schizo…
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Unite's health workers to vote on industrial action

Unite’s health workers to vote on industrial action

Unite’s health care workers in Northern Ireland are to be balloted on taking industrial action over…
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UK’s first dedicated help centre for students with severe mental health issues to officially open

The country’s first dedicated help centre for students with severe mental health issues is to o…
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Bradford’s health data below UK average – but healthy lifestyle is cheaper

A RECENTLY published report reveals Bradford has life expectancy, obesity and alcohol-related harm …
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Not all Norfolk toddlers have had mandatory health checks

Not all Norfolk toddlers have had mandatory health checks

Out of 2,244 two-year-olds in Norfolk, 323 did not see a health visitor between April and June 2019, the latest data from the Department of Health and …
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Benin Activist Brings Health Kits to Haiti’s Poor | Voice of America – English

French Beninese writer and activist Kemi Seba is in Haiti this weekend on a humanitarian mission. Seba traveled to the Caribbean nation to show support for the PetroChallenger anti-corruption movement and for the residents of the poorest slums of the capital. VOA Creole spoke with the activist as he was distributing sanitary kits in Port-au-Prince. “We wanted to show that we are capable and that we don’t have to wait for the government to act, we can take action ourselves to show our support,” Seba said. “Although we have meager resources we only exist when we can share what we have with others in the context of this dimension, this dynamic,” he added. “We have medical staff with us, midwives, specialists who are not only distributing the kits but also doing free consultations. They are volunteers who gave their time to make this happen.” The sanitary kits contained items such as soap, toothpaste and medicine. Seba said his NGO bought the medicine, which it distributed with the help of local doctors who accompanied them. While the kits don’t address everyone’s needs, he said they do contain basic items that can help with some of the people’s most urgent needs. “We wanted to do this because Haiti is a source of black pride worldwide, and because Haiti faces an extremely difficult situation now because of this crisis, which affects the social and economic sectors of the country,” Seba said. “Many are unable to purchase medicine because they have not been paid for five months.” Haiti’s health sector has suffered during the anti-corruption and anti-government protests that intensified in February of this year. The country’s health sector took to the streets in October, joining anti-corruption protesters to decry the deplorable conditions such as lack of water, electricity and sanitation, which has jeopardized health care workers’ ability to care for the sick. “The crisis has had a devastating impact on us,” Dr. Jessy Adrien, executive director of the government university hospital, told VOA Creole in October. “Patients are unable to reach us and neither are medical staff due to the barricades in the streets.” Adrien said the crisis has also created a human resource shortage and a dangerous sanitary situation. “For over three or four weeks, there has been no trash collection and this has created a dangerous, deadly sanitary condition, whereby germs and bacteria are multiplying. For hygienic reasons we must be able to dispose of these biohazards efficiently,” she said. During a September 20 protest, a young doctor working at a Port-au-Prince hospital told VOA: “Sometimes we’re unable to get to the hospital due to the fuel shortage. … A child died recently at our hospital due to this fuel shortage. People can’t live like this.” The protests that have swept Haiti were sparked by a fuel price increase in July 2018. They have intensified and swept the nation since then, with thousands taking to the streets on a weekly basis to demand President Jovenel Moise step down. Protesters accuse him of being corrupt and being incapable of resolving the country’s problems. President Moise denies the corruption allegations and in recent weeks has taken steps to address the protesters’ concerns, such as naming new Cabinet ministers, visiting local businesses, and speaking directly to the people on traditional and social media. He has also called for a national dialogue to discuss ways to resolve the political impasse, but the opposition has repeatedly rejected the offer. Activist Seba told VOA he hopes his effort will spark future progress. “We hope this will not be a just drop in the bucket, but rather the beginning of a process to address this issue with sister institutions and medical partnerships who are already working here. I want to especially thank the medical staff who helped us bring this mission to fruition today,” he said. The local residents, who did not wish to be photographed, expressed gratitude and thanks to Seba and his team for taking the time to visit them and address some of their most urgent needs. Jacquelin Belizaire and Matiado Vilme in Port-au-Prince contributed to this report.
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Emily Atack health: Actress’ battle ‘I have days where I struggle to get out of bed’

Speaking to OK she added: “I’m med-free now. I used medication to get me out of bed in …
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Where to find mental health support in Devon

Where to find mental health support in Devon

Many of us will experience mental illness in our life time-either directly or through loved ones. T…
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Pengmen International Trading Company Developed a Series of Health Products by Using the …

BEIJING–(BUSINESS WIRE )–Pengmen International Trading Company is active in Indian red sandalwood…
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Fashion stylist, 24, is slammed for selling a $97 health book about the importance of ‘energy …

A fashion stylist has been heavily criticised for publishing a $97 health and fitness advice book despite not having a nutrition degree – but she claims all of the information is ‘backed by science’. Emily Davies, who has 264,000 followers on Instagram, released the 77-page eBook titled ‘The Ultimate Guide to your Best Body’, which includes claims about ‘energy balance’ and health myths. The 24-year-old, from Perth, who has a degree in fashion business, was initially praised for the book, before others started to wonder if she was qualified.  ‘Wait, should you be sharing a book like this? Did you study nutrition?’ One fan said.  ‘This book could prove harmful in the wrong hands…’ said another. In response to the discussion, Emily said there was no cause for alarm and she worked with Mandy Hopper, who has a masters in sport science, to write it. ‘Everything that’s in there is actually referenced back to science and anyone that would purchase the eBook would be able to see that… so even if I did write it myself, it’s still 100 per cent referenced to science,’ she told Perth Now. ‘If people follow you then they want to follow you, there are always going to be people who disagree with what you are doing, but don’t focus on the bad things that people are saying.’ Mandy Hopper, who owns MH Performance personal coaching centre, also defended the book on her social media page. ‘This is the only book at the minute with thoroughly researched guidelines written specifically for women experiencing the pressures, stresses and expectations of today’s world,’ she said. Inside readers will learn about the importance of ‘energy balance’ and its role in health and body composition, as well as the biggest ‘dangerous for your health’ myths about calories. Emily said the eBook will explain how your major hormones affect fat stores, energy levels, your mood, memory, menstrual cycle, sleep quality, stress and cravings. The blonde has struggled with her own body issues in the past, suffering from severe bloating caused by an unbalanced, ‘leaky’ gut. While some customers have raised alarm at the $97 price point, the majority of her followers have been happy to make the purchase.
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Stanford Health Care officially opens doors to new Stanford Hospital

Stanford Health Care officially opens doors to new Stanford Hospital

Over 3 ½ hours today, more than 1,600 staff members and faculty helped support the transition of a…
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Baker joins staff of St. Lawrence Health System

GOUVERNEUR — Peggy Baker, LCSW, has joined the staff of St. Lawrence Health System. She is provid…
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Private health insurers accused of lying about costs to raise premiums

Australia’s big private health insurers have been accused of a sham, with plans to hike premiums again next year – some by twice the rate of inflation.
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Smart toilets? Welcome to the future of health care

Smart toilets? Welcome to the future of health care

Welcome to the future of health care … toilets once again by allowing it to not just dispose of waste, but to give access to your health information.”.
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Prince Andrew health: Being shot at in Falklands War gave him ‘peculiar’ sweat condition

The Duke of York has broken his silence on the Jeffrey Epstein scandal in a world exclusive interview with BBC Newsnight. Until now, Andrew – who has strongly denied claims that he had sex with Epstein accuser Virginia Giuffre (nee Roberts) – had only released statements on the issue through Buckingham Palace’s press office. The Duke of York also made a revelation about his health during the interview. BBC interviewer Emily Maitlis described allegations made against the Duke of York by Virginia Giuffre (nee Roberts) during the Newsnight interview. Emily Maitlis said: “She was very specific about that night, she described dancing with you.” Ms Maitlis continued: “And you profusely sweating and that she went on to have bath possibly.” The Duke of York then revealed a “peculiar medical condition” he said he struggled with at the time. The Duke of York said: “There’s a slight problem with the sweating because I have a peculiar medical condition which is that I don’t sweat or I didn’t sweat at the time and that was…was it…yes, I didn’t sweat at the time because I had suffered what I would describe as an overdose of adrenalin in the Falkland’s War when I was shot at and I simply…it was almost impossible for me to sweat.  “And it’s only because I have done a number of things in the recent past that I am starting to be able to do that again.  “So I’m afraid to say that there’s a medical condition that says that I didn’t do it so therefore…” The Duke of York has spoken previously about being shot while on active service in the Falklands War. Queen knows the monarchy ‘is in good hands’ with Kate Middleton [INSIGHT] Meghan Markle and Harry ‘can’t leave it too long’ to see family [INSIGHT] Prince Philip’s wedding behaviour showed he wouldn’t be ‘intimidated’ [INSIGHT] In the interview, the Duke of York detailed how he feared he would not come home from the Falklands after being shot. He said: “If you’ve been through those sorts of experiences you understand the frailty of life. “And you just look at life in a subtlety different way and you try and achieve more, and I suppose that was it. “I was very lucky to come back without having been shot down and it was just one of those occasions. “I have to say that afterwards I thought I was completely invincible and if anybody wanted to do it again, absolutely bring it on.  “But I’ve realised the error of my ways now and I think that’s more foolish.” The Duke of York was asked if he ever believed he might not come home, to which he replied: “Yeah probably a couple of times. But that’s normal.” Sorry, we are unable to accept comments about this article at the moment. However, you will find some great articles which you can comment on right now in our Comment section. See today’s front and back pages, download the newspaper, order back issues and use the historic Daily Express newspaper archive.
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New visitor check-in policies at Baptist Health begin Tuesday

Beginning Tuesday, visitors age 18 and older to Baptist Health hospitals will be asked to present a valid government-issued photo identification to …
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