Health center gives monetary incentives for people to get vaccine – WLOX

Health center gives monetary incentives for people to get vaccine – WLOX

JACKSON, Miss. (WLBT) -The promise of a $50 gift card created a long line to get the COVID vaccine …
See all stories on this topic

NHS Lanarkshire aims to improve mental health by getting patients on their bikes – Daily Record

A programme will empower patients to tackle stimulating mountain biking trails across Lanarkshire. …
See all stories on this topic

How the U.S. could address confusing, shifting COVID-19 health directives – YouTube

More collaboration between the CDC and the FDA would help, says Joshua Sharfstein, professor at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns …
See all stories on this topic

Health unions call for 'inflation-busting' pay rise for NHS workers | Evening Standard

Health unions call for ‘inflation-busting’ pay rise for NHS workers | Evening Standard

In evidence to the independent NHS pay review body, 14 unions representing 1.2 million health staff…
See all stories on this topic

Toronto Public Health confirms COVID-19-related death in young person | CTV News

Health officials in Toronto have confirmed the COVID-19-related death of a person under the age of …
See all stories on this topic

Health Ministry: 4th dose triples protection from serious illness for over-60s | The Times of Israel

The Health Ministry said on Sunday that the fourth vaccine dose for those aged 60 and up offers a t…
See all stories on this topic

Anthology created for mothers struggling with perinatal mental health – Saskatoon | Globalnews.ca

Anthology created for mothers struggling with perinatal mental health – Saskatoon | Globalnews.ca

A recent study published in The Lancet Psychiatry shows one in three women suffer from pre-natal or…
See all stories on this topic

Kitchen launches mental health support group – DNG Online Limited – DnG24

Kate’s Kitchen is cooking up plans to launch ‘Stronger Together’ next month – a weekly supp…
See all stories on this topic

COVID-19: B.C. health care needs to be ‘reimagined’ as pandemic hits two-year mark …

“Never, never in my wildest nightmare did I think that we would still be in this and worse, actuall…
See all stories on this topic

Health Dept May Scale Down Tele-med Wing | Kolkata News – Times of India

Health Dept May Scale Down Tele-med Wing | Kolkata News – Times of India

The number of calls to the state health department’s helpline numbers for Covid-19 has dropped sharply. Even as the third-wave surge has seen a …
See all stories on this topic

From burnout to LGBTQIA+ representation: Toolkit highlights mental health needs at …

Mental health has dominated conversations in many spheres but still lacks prominence in the workpla…
See all stories on this topic

Fife College expands health and wellbeing support for students | Dunfermline Press

Carol Hunter, Health and Wellbeing Advisor at Fife College, is pictured. These adverts enable local…
See all stories on this topic

Researchers call for tailored public health messaging about COVID-19 vaccination for HIV patients

Researchers call for tailored public health messaging about COVID-19 vaccination for HIV patients

While most people living with HIV have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, younger …
See all stories on this topic

Mexican president opens up about his health after overnight hospital stay for heart procedure – CBC

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador spoke with unusual frankness about his health on Satu…
See all stories on this topic

Health Funders Group Meeting | SoCal Grantmakers

Save the Date! Event description will be available closer to the event date. The SCG Health Funders…
See all stories on this topic

A 9-8-8 crisis line is coming. Mental health services ask: How do we stretch even more? – WHYY

A 9-8-8 crisis line is coming. Mental health services ask: How do we stretch even more? – WHYY

Pennsylvanians will be able to call 9-8-8, a new hotline for mental health crises, by July. The aim…
See all stories on this topic

Health officials warn of rise of COVID-19 testing scams with Omicron surge – KCRG

DUBUQUE, Iowa (KCRG) – Alex Wehrspann says his mother got tested for COVID-19 at a local clinic and…
See all stories on this topic

Suffolk-wide survey on people’s mental health proposed | East Anglian Daily Times

Plans for a countywide survey of mental health have been voiced as part of public health efforts to…
See all stories on this topic

Pace is in the pink of health | Deccan Herald

Pace is in the pink of health | Deccan Herald

Design accident-free roads Even a few years ago, had someone told you that India would have the best fast bowling attack in the world, chances are you would have scoffed in derision. Notwithstanding the series loss in South Africa, that’s exactly what the reality is, backed up by statistics since the start of 2018.   In a country where spin was forever the most potent weapon of destruction, assembling a quality fast-bowling bench was a difficult proposition. The likes of Kapil Dev, Javagal Srinath and Zaheer Khan emerged despite the system, not necessarily because of it. As an Indian fan, one envied and yearned for the kind of pace resources Pakistan possessed for years. It perhaps needed the alignment of stars in the shape of a captain who understood the imperativeness of pace in winning Tests outside Asia on a consistent basis, a support staff that diligently worked towards developing a quality group and most importantly, the pacers themselves who were willing to work their backsides off to improve their fitness. Indian quicks were seldom short on skill, but lack of requisite fitness constrained them from bowling long spells with unflagging intensity. Once that aspect was addressed, the missing piece in the jigsaw fell in place. That the CV of Indian pace in Tests changed dramatically after the arrival of Jasprit Bumrah in 2018 is no coincidence either. Ishant Sharma had been there since 2007, Umesh Yadav made his debut in 2011, Mohammed Shami and Bhuvneshwar Kumar first played for the country in 2013. Yet, there was something missing, something that held them back from graduating into a world-class pace unit. Bumrah provided the X-factor and India started dishing out to opponents what their batsmen had been served up regularly. With the firm backing of then skipper Virat Kohli, they worked like a well-oiled machine, feeding off each other’s success and heralding a quality Test fast-bowling era across the world. Australia have the biggest fast-bowling pool at the moment; South Africa, on the evidence of their recent success against India, are slowly but surely regaining their glory days when Allan Donald, Shaun Pollock, Makhaya Ntini, Jacques Kallis and the irrepressible Dale Steyn manned their attack. With James Anderson and Stuart Broad constants for over a decade now, England have always been formidable at home, not unlike New Zealand with Tim Southee, Trent Boult, Neil Wagner and now Kyle Jamieson in their ranks. The current scenario isn’t quite a throwback to the era when West Indies would unleash the fearsome pace quartet of Andy Roberts, Michael Holding, Joel Garner and Colin Croft, followed by the days of Malcolm Marshall and Sylvester Clarke. And it wasn’t long before another menacing quartet of Courtney Walsh, Curtley Ambrose, Ian Bishop and Patrick Patterson sent shivers down batsmen’s spine.      Australia boasted the dangerous Dennis Lillee and Jeff Thomson from the early 1970s to the mid-80s. Around the same time, the England attack was excellent and revolved around John Snow and Bob Willis and later Ian Botham. The later generation of Matthew Hoggard, Darren Gough, Andy Caddick, Steve Harmison and Andrew Flintoff, among others, were excellent at home and occasionally good overseas.    While Pakistan always had a decent pace attack, the unearthing of Wasim Akram and Waqar Younis, who linked up with Imran Khan, heralded a new chapter in world cricket. From the mid-1980s to the early 2000s, the Pakistani quicks fired the imagination of the cricketing world, combining frightening pace with unmatched skills. Shoaib Akhtar, Mohammed Asif and Mohammad Amir appeared set to carry forward the great legacy but the dalliances of the last two in spot-fixing triggered the great decline.       Since their readmission to world cricket, South Africa have added to world cricket’s fast bowling riches. While the likes of Donald, Pollock and Steyn unnerved batsmen at home, they were equally good overseas, one of the primary reasons for South Africa’s impressive away record until recently. There was a certain lull in Australia post the exit of Lillee and Thomson but Glenn McGrath, Jason Gillespie, Brett Lee and later Mitchell Johnson helped restore their primacy in world cricket.    Doing well against these attacks enhanced the stature of batsmen. That’s why the performances of Sachin Tendulkar, Rahul Dravid, Brian Lara, Ricky Ponting or Kallis, among others, carry more value compared to current greats like Kohli, Steve Smith, Joe Root or Kane Williamson. It must be pointed out, though, that modern-day cricket has its own share of challenges in terms of the amount of cricket and the number of formats in vogue. The pandemic has only added to their burden.     However, with the emergence of the Indian attack and the resurgence of South African and Australian fast bowling, Test cricket is looking much more compelling and competitive. The phased retirements of McGrath, Gillespie, Lee and Johnson had taken the sting out of the Aussie attack, but the maturing of Pat Cummins, Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazlewood has helped them reclaim lost ground. Kagiso Rabada, Lungi Ngidi and Anrich Nortje have an able support group in Kolpak-returnee Duanne Olivier and the young Marco Jansen. There are no easy runs to gather as demanding conditions and testing bowling have made life harder for batsmen. “Yes, I agree there are a lot of fast bowlers coming up in a lot of countries,” said former India pacer Venkatesh Prasad. “The fitness has improved a lot and that has helped them improve their pace as well. Maybe a bit of swing also they have added… Especially the Indian bowlers. They are very good at swinging and seaming the ball.” That said, there is a distinct difference between pace attacks of the past and the current ones. While there’s still time for them to set the anomaly right, it’s not hard to miss the fact that almost all of them are good at home and look quite pedestrian in unhelpful conditions. Whether it’s Australia, South Africa, England or New Zealand, they have all struggled to replicate home performances overseas. “I am not still sure if skill levels are comparable (with yesteryear pacers) but I would say the more important aspect is patience,” pointed out Prasad. “Of late I haven’t seen enough patience in fast bowlers. You say normal is boring, right? To keep hitting those fourth stump lines is crucial. Every single delivery you bowl, you have to try and make sure you hit those lines. There might be times when you don’t get wickets but it’s important to maintain that pressure. We don’t see that pacer doing that now.” “Earlier they used to tell us that when we bowled a ball and if a batsman struggled, you keep on repeating that particular ball. What has happened now is that the moment you bowl a delivery, whether it’s good or bad, the second delivery is going to be different. Because if you repeat that delivery, you might get thrashed in a T20 as you become predictable. That sort of mindset has come into the longer format as well. They have lost that patience, the faith in their stock delivery,” Prasad offered.  Surprisingly, India’s pacers are an honourable exception to this trend. Since 2018, they have taken more wickets away from home (see the box) than any other pace attack in the world. From Australia to England and the West Indies to South Africa, they have been as good as or better than home bowlers, proving themselves as an all-weather attack. The recent South Africa series may contradict this claim, but it’s just two poor second innings where they failed to deliver.    Even taking this shortcoming into consideration, they have set stall as the leaders of pace bowling worldwide, playing their part in ensuring that particular facet of the game is a lot healthier now than it was four years ago. We use cookies to understand how you use our site and to improve user experience. This includes personalising content and advertising. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies, revised Privacy Policy.
See all stories on this topic

Australia’s Jarring Shift in Public-Health Messaging – Bloomberg

Please make sure your browser supports JavaScript and cookies and that you are not blocking them fr…
See all stories on this topic

Queensland’s chief health officer Dr John Gerrard says 1 MILLION are already infected with Covid

Covid cases have ‘almost certainly’ spiked beyond a million in Queensland, as the state’s plain-spe…
See all stories on this topic

Jefferson Health data breach exposed billing info of 9000 patients – PhillyVoice

Jefferson Health data breach exposed billing info of 9000 patients – PhillyVoice

Thom Carroll/for PhillyVoice Jefferson Health, one of Philadelphia’s biggest hospital systems, …
See all stories on this topic

Human Powered Health riders in Portugal for January training camp – Gallery | Cyclingnews

Human Powered Health riders and staff gathered in the southernmost coastal region of Portugal for their first training camp of 2022. Based in Portimão …
See all stories on this topic

Foods that unclog arteries: Health experts say eat these to prevent stroke | Hindustan Times

Clogged up arteries may put increase an individual’s risk of sudden heart attack, heart failure or even stroke. Health experts recommend these …
See all stories on this topic

IBM sells Watson Health assets to investment firm Francisco Partners | ZDNet

IBM sells Watson Health assets to investment firm Francisco Partners | ZDNet

After struggling to grow the business unit and turning its focus to higher-margin businesses, IBM f…
See all stories on this topic

Swiss health minister ponders end of Covid-19 certificate – SWI swissinfo.ch

Switzerland’s health minister, Alain Berset, says the use of the Covid-19 certificate could soon be over.
See all stories on this topic

Les Dennis health: Star, 68, had ‘a lot of warnings’ of declining health – Daily Express

We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you’ve consented to and to improve our understanding…
See all stories on this topic

Exercise boosts the brain — and mental health – Knowable Magazine

Exercise boosts the brain — and mental health – Knowable Magazine

Knowable Magazine is from Annual Reviews, a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integ…
See all stories on this topic

World Health Organization Says COVID-Related Travel Restrictions Should Be Lifted | TravelPulse

For more information on United States For more Impacting Travel News The World Health Organization …
See all stories on this topic

Osaka inspires Anisimova to talk about mental health ‘hard years’ – France 24

Melbourne (AFP) – Amanda Anisimova is a big fan of Naomi Osaka for bringing athletes’ mental heal…
See all stories on this topic