US politics could slow down WTO director selection process

US politics could slow down WTO director selection process

Delivered daily by 10 a.m., Morning Trade examines the latest news in global trade politics and pol…
See all stories on this topic

The curse of Clutha-Southland or dirty politics?

National’s Clutha-Southland MP Hamish Walker is being told to take a hike after leaking sensitive p…
See all stories on this topic

Politics in a Pandemic

Politics in a Pandemic: Governing, Representing, and Campaigning Remotely. Event Details. Date & Time: July 8, 2020; 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM. Location.
See all stories on this topic

When American Politics Turned Toxic

When American Politics Turned Toxic

BURNING DOWN THE HOUSE Newt Gingrich, the Fall of a Speaker, and the Rise of the New Republican Par…
See all stories on this topic

Privacy breach disappointing and has ‘ring of dirty politics’ – Hipkins

Minister of Health and State Services Chris Hipkins says he is disappointed the leak of Covid-19 patient details involved politicians, but he does not want to prejudice the investigation. This evening, National MP Hamish Walker released a statement, confirming he had passed on details to media containing Covid-19 patient details that was given to him “by a source”. He has been stripped of his portfolios by National leader Todd Muller. Acting chief executive of Auckland Rescue Helicopter Trust Michelle Boag later confirmed she gave the patient details to Walker. Hipkins said he was very disappointed in the revelations that politicians were involved in the privacy breach, but he did not want to prejudice the investigation. “This is a very disappointing situation. It does have a ring of dirty politics about it and this could be very sad for the upcoming election.” “I was disappointed because sometimes members of parliament are given information inappropriately – that does happen from time to time – and I do think New Zealanders have to rely on the judgment of members of parliament to do the right thing … and clearly that hasn’t happened in this case.” He said all members of parliament should act with care when given this type of information, regardless of how they were given it. “I think if a member of parliament can’t accept that receiving people’s health information is something that they should treat with a degree of confidence then that says quite a lot about their own levels of personal integrity and judgement.” Hipkins, who said he found out about Walker and Boag’s admissions when it broke on the news, said he would not comment on internal matters within another party. He said it was important to get answers to the questions in the inquiry headed by Michael Heron. “It’s important that Michael Heron has the opportunity to complete that investigation.” He said he had not spoken to Heron because it was important for him to conduct the investigation independently and thoroughly. “It’s very important that I’m not involved in that process and that he will make all of the relevant judgments on his own.” He said the Helicopter Trust would have access to people’s confidential health information because of the nature of their work. “And all New Zealanders are entitled to know that any information about them that that organisation has will be treated with utmost confidence and with their privacy being respected.” He would not elaborate on what subsequent action would follow until the investigation runs its course. He thanked media once again for not publishing the information they were given. “I’m pleased there’s more information coming out about how that made it into the public domain, because potentially it might speed up the investigation. I want to get to the bottom of this as quickly as possible so that if there are any weaknesses they can be rectified.” He urged anyone with any further information to step forward. The breach came about when RNZ and three other media organisations were provided details including the full names, addresses, ages and quarantine locations of the 18 active Covid-19 cases at that time. Walker said in a statement tonight he did this to expose the government’s shortcomings so they would be rectified. “It was never intended that the personal details would be made public, and they have not been, either by me or the persons I forwarded them to. “I have received legal advice that I have not committed any criminal offence.” He sincerely apologised for how he had handled the information and to the people affected, saying he would be fully cooperating with Heron’s inquiry. Boag also apologised, and expressed her regret over her actions and announced she would step down from her role at the Trust. In a tweet from his personal account, Privacy Commissioner John Edwards summed up the situation as “outrageous, unbelievable, indefensible”.
See all stories on this topic

Filibuster: how the meaning changed from piracy to politics

Filibuster: how the meaning changed from piracy to politics. Filibuster, freebooter, flyboat all have the same Dutch ancestor: vrijbuiter, meaning …
See all stories on this topic

No 10 is changing the way it does politics – and it's a major risk

No 10 is changing the way it does politics – and it’s a major risk

No 10 is changing the way it does politics – and it’s a major risk. Paul Harrison. In televising its daily lobby briefings, Downing Street is giving an …
See all stories on this topic

Meet four young activists fighting for change in nightlife, tech and politics

Britain has a proud history of rebellion and there’s never been more reason to speak truth to pow…
See all stories on this topic

Power, Politics + Pigskin

The team than many of you love is about to have a new name. It’s that simple. There’s way…
See all stories on this topic

Andrew Neil casts doubt on his future at the BBC as Politics Live returns without him

Andrew Neil casts doubt on his future at the BBC as Politics Live returns without him

Andrew Neil says his future at the BBC is in doubt and he may be “surplus to requirements”. The…
See all stories on this topic

Freeing politics from the grip of ‘the lobby’

No10’s plan for daily televised briefings shatters the hold a clique of political journalists have …
See all stories on this topic

Did the Popular Vote Get a Win Today?

Hi. Welcome to On Politics, your guide to the day in national politics. Sign up here to get On Poli…
See all stories on this topic

Religious intolerance, majoritarian politics shouldn't be allowed to undermine India's soft power …

Religious intolerance, majoritarian politics shouldn’t be allowed to undermine India’s soft power …

He further said it is essential that India does not allow “spectre of religious intolerance and majoritarian politics to undermine our soft power which …
See all stories on this topic

Can we Build a Politics of hope?

Deep down, are humans really selfish, brutal, and cruel? For much of the last century the most famo…
See all stories on this topic

Take It Down!: Symbolic Politics Is Just That

No one can right the wrongs perpetrated in the past and yet we must address the injustices of the p…
See all stories on this topic

Politics, power and their influence in world of art

Politics, power and their influence in world of art

Folks – I heartily agree with the statement: “All art is propaganda!”  I consider my own work …
See all stories on this topic

Equivalency Framing in Political Decision Making

Politics is increasingly reliant on numerical descriptions of the world. Numbers are relied upon for their ability to communicate some unambiguous …
See all stories on this topic

Explained: Kanye West, his career, politics, and now presidential bid

This is not the first time Kanye West has declared his intention to run for the Oval Office. (Phot…
See all stories on this topic

Marine Commandant aims to boost Corps' mobility and stay out of politics while addressing social …

Marine Commandant aims to boost Corps’ mobility and stay out of politics while addressing social …

Marine Commandant Gen. David Berger sat down with ABC News Chief Global Affairs Correspondent Martha Raddatz to talk racial tensions, deterring China and Russia, and keeping the Corps away from politics. Here is their discussion. Banning the Confederate flag, examining possible racial disparities As debate over Army installations named after Confederates rages, the Marine Corps, which has no such bases, has led the services in banning displays of the Confederate battle flag. “It became pretty clear that some symbols were being hijacked by organizations and used a very bad, negative way,” Berger said on Tuesday. “The Confederate battle flag was part of that.” The order to remove depictions of the flag on Marine bases, made by Berger in February, took effect in early June. Berger said that while he anticipated resistance from some Marines who see it as part of their heritage, that such divisive symbols can ultimately undermine unit cohesion. “We’re not erasing history by any means. It’s a symbol. But the bigger symbol is the things that draw the team together so that we can operate with that kind of implicit trust. We have a flag — it’s the American flag. We have the Marine Corps colors. We have things that unify us — we’ll be able to operate as a team,” Berger said. “Anything that gets in the way of that is a problem.” When asked about data that show African American Marines are more likely to receive a guilty finding for courts martial and non-judicial punishments, Berger was careful not to take correlation as causation, and vowed to review the matter. “Those things to us are facts. They’re not debatable — it’s data. So now we have to trace back what does it actually mean? I am more patient in jumping to a conclusion now than probably I was 15, 20 years ago,” Berger said. Not your father’s Marine Corps? In a February Twitter thread, Berger listed social issues such as paid maternity leave and encouraging women to enter combat roles as his “most important matters for immediate execution.” “Too many leaders … the more senior you get the more you talk, the less you listen,” Berger told Raddatz. “I am trying to be more disciplined and listen more.” Berger said many of his priorities came from listening to his Marines. He related a story of speaking with troops in Rhode Island in which one Marine suggested making the maternity leave policy more flexible for those married to other service members. Instead of giving the mother and father each a set amount of time, she proposed giving the couple one lump sum of days for them to split up depending on their particular circumstances. “I never would have thought about it, you could stay up all night and not think of those kind of ideas,” Berger said. “But to them it’s real.” But Berger was careful not to frame the proposed changes as handouts. “She’s not complaining, she’s got a solution,” he said. Berger’s tweet thread also mentioned expanding the parental leave policy to include adoptive parents and same-sex couples. Raddatz asked him how his thinking has evolved since the times before gays were allowed to openly serve. “I think, based on the people who were my mentors, my coaches, they kept circling me back to what’s the standard? Can you do the job? Would you trust them in a firefight? Everything else doesn’t really matter,” Berger said. Berger’s sense of fairness cuts both ways; while he supports opening up combat roles previously closed to women, he insists standards will not be lowered to let them in. “You are not going to have any kind of advantage based on your gender or your ethnicity or anything else. You gotta be able to carry the load. That’s why I trust you, right? Because if we’re going to go through that doorway right there, you and me, and I get shot at, I know you’re gonna drag me out, because I trust you can carry the load, you can do the job. So standards are the standards,” he said. A new vision: Leaner, meaner, ready to face China and Russia While Berger voiced his social concerns on Twitter, he proposed a dramatic revision of the Marine Corps’ fighting posture and took on grave possibilities like facing China and Russia in his Commandant’s Planning Guidance report. “I will continue to advocate for the continued forward deployment of our forces globally to compete against the malign activities of China, Russia, Iran, and their proxies — with a prioritized focus on China’s One Belt One Road initiative and Chinese malign activities in the East and South China Seas,” his planning guidance read. Berger’s plan is an integration of both future and past, of returning the Marine Corps to its forward-deployed, expeditionary roots with the Navy, as well as adopting more modern platforms like drones. The more lithe force Berger envisions means doing away with heavy assets like tanks over the next decade, and working in a “very close pairing” with the Navy. “Then you can move around. You can be in one place, and then six hours later be in a very different place. You have the mobility, you’re not required to use a country to base out of at all. You can move America’s force where you need it,” Berger said. Berger said that war with China would be “terrible for both countries,” adding deterrence is his focus with it and Russia. “You have to convince them that taking the next step would … not be worth it, so don’t go there,” he said. The separation of Corps and state America’s top military official apologized for taking part in President Donald Trump’s photo op in front of St. John’s Church in June. “I should not have been there,” said Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in a commencement address to National Defense University. “My presence in that moment and in that environment created a perception of the military involved in domestic politics.” Berger defended Milley to Martha Raddatz. “If you know the chairman like you and I do, you knew right away that was not where he intended to be,” Berger said. “So although some people would see the photograph and don’t know him and draw a quick conclusion, those of us who have served with him … knew that was not where he intended to be.” Berger went on to say that staying out of politics is “part of the reason why America trusts its military.” “We understand the chain of command, but we cannot become a political tool either,” Berger said. “We are determined to stay on the outside, and Chairman Milly is leading that charge, as he should as chairman.” Training through COVID-19 Unlike the Army, which briefly shut down its boot camps, Berger kept his service at work building recruits into Marines, while cutting numbers and adding precautions. “Our approach was: We need to keep going. We need to keep recruiting. We need to keep recruit training, we need to keep training officer candidates,” Berger said. Families of fallen Marines ‘entitled’ to answers on alleged Russian plot The White House on Tuesday continued to provide briefings to select members of Congress on the intelligence about reported Russian bounties on U.S. troops in Afghanistan, which a military official told ABC News showed Russian intelligence officers had offered to pay Taliban militants to kill American troops over the last year. Lawmakers have called on the administration to share more information and possibly take action. Berger, who commanded troops in Afghanistan, said he doesn’t believe he ever saw anything about Russian meddling in intelligence reports, but added that “it takes a lot to surprise me now.” Staff Sgt. Christopher K.A. Slutman, Sgt. Benjamin S. Hines and Cpl. Robert A. Hendriks were killed when a car bomb exploded near their vehicle as their convoy headed back to the base, making them three of the 17 Americans killed during combat in Afghanistan in 2019. Some parents of the fallen Marines have demanded answers as to whether the possible plot was known of by the U.S. before their sons’ demise, and if it played any role. “And I think they’re entitled to it,” Berger said. “You don’t want to lead them in any direction. You just have to look at the facts like always, investigate thoroughly.”
See all stories on this topic

‘Politics being played on Covid-19 issue as well’

A: No doubt, Covid-19 is a disease but politics is being played on this issue as well. There are incumbent Prime Ministers and chief ministers from …
See all stories on this topic

The intersection of politics and science

The best book Chanakya read this year was A Dominant Character: The Radical Science and Restless Po…
See all stories on this topic

Facebook boycott: Principles or politics?

Facebook boycott: Principles or politics?

THE AD CONTRARIAN: If the current incipient rejection of Facebook is going to have legs it has to b…
See all stories on this topic

Letter: Politics is ruining our love of sports

After reading Danny Wilson’s letter Tuesday, I must put forward my thoughts and reactions as an 8…
See all stories on this topic

Has COVID-19 Pushed Women in Politics off Kenya’s Agenda?

Africa, Editors’ Choice, Featured, Gender, Headlines, TerraViva United Nations, Women in Politics G…
See all stories on this topic

'Criminalisation of politics has scaled new heights': Nadda calls for TMC govt ouster

‘Criminalisation of politics has scaled new heights’: Nadda calls for TMC govt ouster

Lauding Jana Sangh founder Syama Prasad Mookerjee for fighting for a united India and opposing the “appeasement politics” of Jawaharlal Nehru, …
See all stories on this topic

Commentary: Domestic politics may delay India’s truce with China

meREWARDS lets you get coupon deals, and earn cashback when you complete surveys, dine, travel and …
See all stories on this topic

It’s OK to be smart: Stop playing politics and start wearing a mask, biologist urges

A cartoon posted on a local newspaper’s Facebook page is using the Holocaust to criticize Kansas …
See all stories on this topic

The politics of race are shifting, and politicians are struggling to keep pace

The politics of race are shifting, and politicians are struggling to keep pace

Race has been a defining issue in American politics since before the country formally came into existence, a dividing line marked by generations of …
See all stories on this topic

Explainer: Why one party dominates Singapore politics

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Singaporeans are expected to return the People’s Action Party to power …
See all stories on this topic

‘It’s about equality, not politics,’ says Hamilton as 6 drivers refuse to take knee

SPIELBERG, Austria: Lewis Hamilton insisted on Sunday (Jul 5) his fight against racism is “about eq…
See all stories on this topic