Opinion | The Extremely Weird Politics of Covid – The New York Times

Opinion | The Extremely Weird Politics of Covid – The New York Times

I want to put a text before you, from February 2020, the ideological landscape into which the coron…
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Crises and slow formation process dent confidence in politics – DutchNews.nl

Confidence in politicians and the Dutch political system has plunged over the past year, with six i…
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Inside politics: ‘There will be no three-day working week’ | The Independent

Boris Johnson is set to meet president Joe Biden while the government answers questions about energ…
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Politics latest news: Government eyes taxpayer-funded loans amid crunch talks on energy crisis

Politics latest news: Government eyes taxpayer-funded loans amid crunch talks on energy crisis

E nergy firms could be bailed out using taxpayer-funded loans, as the Government scrambles to resolve the mounting gas crisis. Kwasi Kwarteng, the Business Secretary, has had held several meetings with energy bosses over the weekend and they are expected to continue this week, amid warnings that dozens of companies could go bust. A bailout fund is one of several options on the table, with the industry fearing a financial crisis-style collapse.  James Cleverly, the Foreign Office minister, signalled a willingness to let some of them collapse, telling the BBC: “We would much prefer to see diversity in the market… but our priority is to protect the consumer and protect the integrity of gas supply.” Speaking to Sky News, he added: “We will do absolutely everything we can to protect our consumer… Exactly how we do that will be up for discussion.” He insisted that the UK was “in a pretty good place” because of the nature of supply both domestically and from “reliable” partners such as Norway. Speaking from New York, Boris Johnson said the bounce-back from Covid had caused a global “bottleneck”. Asked whether the problems could last for months, Mr Johnson said: “It could be faster than that, it could be much faster than that.” A s always with Monday, things are only pencilled in until the Speaker has selected urgent questions or ministerial statements later on today – but here is the schedule as things stand.  I’d be very surprised if there isn’t a debate on the energy crisis, but even without that the cost of living is likely to dominate this afternoon’s debate on the Social Security Bill. The House of Commons sits from 2.30pm today. Find out what’s on in the House of Commons today in the #OrderPaper: https://t.co/1kgGNrkA11 Follow the Chamber in real time: https://t.co/HEBiZuz0lv pic.twitter.com/NWBVAfhUIQ I t’s been many years since the country faced a real “cost of living crisis”, but many commentators believe that is precisely what we are in for.  The energy crisis, food shortages and labour shortages are all pushing up prices, with warnings that Christmas could be cancelled (but this time, it’s the turkey that will be missing, rather than your family).  That is combining with tax rises and the end of the £20-a-week uplift to Universal Credit – which could push more than 800,000 people into poverty, according to the Legatum Institute think tank. Some of these issues are outside of the Government’s control – but many are very much within their power to resolve. Either way, there are warnings it could lead to political danger for Boris Johnson and co.  Have your say in the poll below. B oris Johnson might be in New York, but back in Westminster he risks a Tory rebellion over plans to cut the £20 uplift to Universal Credit led by two senior backbenchers.  Iain Duncan Smith, the former Conservative leader, and Damian Green, the deputy prime minister under Theresa May, have tabled an amendment to pensions legislation in a bid block the end of the temporary benefits boost, which will coincide with higher gas bills and the end of furlough. The architect of the Universal Credit system is hoping to have his amendment tacked onto the Social Security (Up-Rating of Benefits) Bill, although there are no guarantees it will be selected as it is not directly relevant. Even if Sir Lindsay Hoyle does so, the vote will be non-binding.  However it could give the Government something of a bloody nose – at a point when the cost of living looks set to become a real political risk for the PM.  A fter a few days spent ironing out the branding, Michael Gove’s bolstered department has finally got its name.  The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG) will become the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (DLUHC) – having narrowly avoided becoming DULU (the Department for the Union and Levelling Up).  Mr Gove’s job title equally verbose: Levelling Up, Housing & Communities Secretary. and minister for intergovernmental relations.  The change was announced over the weekend, along with the news that Andy Haldane, long-time chief economist at the Bank of England, will head the levelling up taskforce launched by Boris Johnson and Mr Gove. He joins as a permanent secretary in the Cabinet Office, on secondment from the Royal Society of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) for six months.    S ir Keir Starmer should investigate whether abuse towards Rosie Duffield is coming from within Labour and make sure it is “nipped in the bud asap”, an MP has said.  Ms Duffield, the MP for Canterbury, has said she will not attend the party’s conference next week over fears for her safety (see 8:56am).  Colleague Emma Lewell-Buck told the BBC it was Ms Duffield’s “personal choice”, saying: “If she feels that she wouldn’t be safe then I think she’s got no choice but to stay away.” She added: “This is symptomatic of how polarised and volatile debate has become in this country, people no longer respect other people’s views or other people’s opinions and they react to each other with anger and aggression. I’m really sad that Rosie doesn’t feel conference is going to be a safe space for her and that is something that we need to tackle. “It’s something that Keir needs to have a look at and say: ‘Where is this coming from?’. If it’s coming from people  within our movement then that needs to be nipped in the bud asap.” T he combination of tax rises, cuts to Universal Credit and surging energy prices could present “real political danger” for the Government, a Tory peer has warned.  Gavin Barwell, a former MP who served as chief of staff under Theresa May, told the BBC the rise in gas prices ” definitely has the potential to become a crisis”. He added: “I think that the first concern of Government will be about ensuring security of supply, making sure that we’re all still getting the gas that we need, both domestic and businesses. But the second concern will be about prices that consumers are being asked to pay… “More generally, they will also be worried about the cost of living. We’ve got the tax increases that they’ve just brought in, we’ve got the Universal Credit reduction, that’s about to come online, plus rising energy bills, I think there is a real political danger here of cost of living issues becoming a real difficulty for the Government.” A further 29 climate change protesters have been arrested at junctions on the M25 and A1M, Hertfordshire Police said, as Insulate Britain demonstrators glued themselves to the road. Chief Superintendent Nick Caveney said: “Officers were on the scene within minutes of being alerted to protest activity, allowing us to put diversions in place to ease the traffic and to make numerous arrests. All protesters involved in this morning’s protests have been arrested and will be taken to custody. “We are working closely with other affected forces to ensure that any further activity is dealt with effectively and efficiently,” he added. “I understand and appreciate the frustration regarding the considerable delays and inconvenience that has occurred as a result of the protests.” In the last week, Hertfordshire Police have made 76 arrests, with a “full investigation” underway “to ensure that hose breaking the law are brought to justice.” T he Government should not expect taxpayers to “write a blank cheque” to resolve the energy crisis, but allow free-market forces to play their part, a think tank has said.  Julian Jessop, economics fellow at the Institute of Economic Affairs, said: “The poorest households should be protected from soaring bills, but the taxpayer should not be expected to write a blank cheque to bail out energy companies. “Market forces need to be allowed to work and if this means that relative prices have to change to balance supply and demand, then so be it. “There may be a case for Government loans to fundamentally sound businesses that are facing temporary problems as a result of global shortages. However, these companies should still be expected to borrow on commercial terms. “Otherwise, there is a risk that the industry fails to adapt and that it remains vulnerable to further shocks.” F rance has cancelled a ministerial defence meeting with Britain this week amid an escalating diplomatic row over a nuclear-powered submarine deal. Paris was left blindsided by the announcement last week of a new trilateral security pact between the UK, US and Australia – known as Aukus – as Canberra cancelled a £72.8 billion deal with the French for diesel-electric submarines as a result.  Reacting with fury this weekend, French foreign minister Jean-Yves Le Drian accused the UK of “permanent opportunism”, while the French Europe minister Clement Beaune accused Britain of being a vassal state of Washington. On Sunday night it emerged that French Armed Forces Minister Florence Parly had decided to scrap a meeting planned for this week with Defence Secretary Ben Wallace. O ne of the small energy firms grappling with the current crisis has warned that it is “unlikely we will see the winter through”, without Government support.  Peter McGirr, chief executive of Green Energy, which supplies around 360,000 people in the UK,  told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme “the outlook is looking bleak” with current events in the market, including continued rising prices and the shortage of gas. Mr McGirr added: “It is not that I have a bad business model or I have a bad business. “We just don’t have as deep pockets to keep going through this crisis. I think that all suppliers are feeling the pinch of this but some of them just have a lot deeper pockets to try and ride out the storm.” “Ego-driven” protesters blocking the M25 are “adding nothing” to the cause of tackling climate change, a Government minister has said. F oreign Office minister James Cleverly told ITV’s Good Morning Britain: “It is a completely inappropriate way of making the point they’re trying to make.” He added: “The vast, vast majority of people want to see us tackling climate change, we are tackling climate change… the UK is actually a real leader on this. “So I have to say, my belief is that those disruptions and protests are more ego-driven, rather than issues-driven. And I would strongly urge the people involved in it not to put themselves and others at harm by this continued disruption.” He added: “These protesters are waking up at lunchtime and claiming credit for the sunrise. The simple fact is the UK is already pushing the world to do more and we are walking the walk as well as talking the talk and these protesters are adding nothing to that discussion.” T he chief executive of the British Meat Processors Association, has said the country could be two weeks away from British meat disappearing from supermarket shelves because of a shortage of CO2. Nick Allen told Sky News: “The meat industry, in particular the pig and poultry industry, use CO2 for humane slaughter. Eighty per cent of pigs and poultry are slaughtered using that process… [the fertiliser plants] closed at very short notice with no warning. It really hit us cold. “We’re hoping and praying the Government can negotiate with these plants to reopen. But even then, it’ll take about three days to restart.” Mr Allen said meat manufacturers have said they have between five and 15 days’ supply left. He added: “Then they will have to stop. That means animals will have to stay on farms. That will cause farmers huge animal welfare problems and British pork and poultry will stay off the shelves. We’re two weeks away from seeing some real impact on the shelves.” A Labour MP who will miss her party conference this week amid fears over her safety has said abuse against women “always turns to violence”.  Rosie Duffield, who has clashed with transgender rights campaigners, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that male ministers who “have had to resign” – such as Matt Hancock – get ” jokey, off-the-cuff and silly” abuse, while women ” get the violence, pictures of guns, pictures of mocked-up nooses”.  Ms Duffield added: “There are groups that would be at the Labour Party conference where my presence would irritate.  “It is hard to know how serious to take threats from people who post them online – I don’t always very often take them that seriously – but they are pretty awful and I did not want to subject myself and other people to that kind of abuse.” T here will be “no need” for Boris Johnson to “bang any tables” as he looks to persuade Joe Biden to restart travel between the UK and US, a minister has said.  The Prime Minister is expected to make an “impassioned” case for why the US President should lift his travel ban by allowing fully vaccinated people in the UK to travel directly into America. James Cleverly, the Foreign Office minister, told Radio 4’s Today programme: “Obviously international travel is incredibly important for the UK. We want to get to situation where Brits can travel to one of our closest partners in the world.” Mr Johnson will be making the case that “travel to and from UK is safe, it is important to us and as a strong international partners it is what we should be looking to do”, he added, stressing that the recent Ausuk deal demonstrated that the two countries were “very much on the same page”.  He added: “I have no doubt there will be no need to bang any tables to get the point across.” T he Government will be looking to maintain the “the diversification of supply”, during crisis talks with energy firms this week, a minister has said.  James Cleverly, the Foreign Officer minister, told Radio 4’s Today programme: “Ultimately, [Kwasi Kwarteng], the Business Secretary, will be discussing with the market, with the sector, what we can do to ensure two things happen. “Firstly to protect consumers from unpredictable price hikes- and the cap is in place to do that. But also security of provision.  Exactly how we do that will be up for discussion. “But we want to make sure diversification of supply – it is better for consumers, it is generally healthier.” T he looming food shortage crisis prompted by the closure of two  large fertiliser plants in Teesside and Cheshire could prompt more CO2 suppliers to launch, a minister has said.  James Cleverly, the Foreign Office minister, told Radio 4’s Today programme that the number of suppliers would be “defined largely by the market”, but that the crisis did “highlight a situation where there small number of providers”.  But Mr Cleverly stressed that it was “short-term challenges, driven by the world economy coming out of Covid-19”.  A minister has refused to say how many British dual nationals were being held in Iran, saying it is not in their best interest to do so.  James Cleverly, the Foreign Office minister, told LBC that Iran “currently hold a number of British dual nationals in detention, completely arbitrary detention”. He insisted he did know the figure, but refused to disclose it, saying: “I’m not going to discuss that this morning because, actually, it’s not always in the best interests of the people that we’re trying to help….  It’s not always in the best interest of the individuals for their cases to be publicised.” Pushed as to whether he knew the figure, he said: “I do, I work on this all the time.” T he major military deal struck between the UK, US and Australia is “not about France,” a minister has said today, amid a diplomatic row.  James Cleverly, the Foreign Office minister, told Sky News: “With any international relationship there are ups and downs. I have no doubt we will be able to resolve any frictions that there are currently with France… This is Global Britain engaging with the world, working with all partners across the world – including Australia and the US.” Responding to reports this morning that France has said trade talks with Australia are now “unthinkable”, Mr Cleverly said: “Contractual relationships between Australia and France is for Australia and France.” T here is no connection between the growing energy crisis and Brexit, Foreign Office minister James Cleverly has said. Asked if there was a link, he told LBC: “No, no, this is hitting a number of countries around the world and it is – I think the Prime Minister summed up rather well – this is a byproduct of the sudden increase in demand as we come out of Covid. “Globally, the UK is in a better position than many countries because, obviously, we have a domestic gas production capability, and our imported gas is from very, very reliable partners like Norway. “So whilst this is affecting many, many parts of the world simultaneously, actually the UK is in a better position than many.” T he release of dual nationals by Iran will be “top of the agenda” at a meeting between new Foreign Secretary Liz Truss and her Iranian counterpart, a Foreign Office minister has said. Ms Truss will meet with Hossein Amir-Abdollahian at the United Nations General Assembly in New York on Monday. James Cleverly said: “We will continue pushing and we will not rest until we get them all home. Their incarceration is arbitrary, it’s completely unjustified and we have made it clear that we will not stop working to get those British dual nationals home.” Asked how confident he was that Ms Truss would succeed where others had failed, he said: “Well, it is never easy negotiating with the Iranian leadership. But… she’s an incredibly focused and energetic minister, she’s well-regarded for that, and I have no doubt that she will apply that energy to these negotiations.” T he Government’s “priority” is ensuring that food supplies are unaffected by gas shortages, a minister has said.  Speaking after the owner of Bernard Matthews warned that C)2 shortages mean “Christmas will be cancelled” (see post below), James Cleverly said the Government was working to address “some short-term shortages.” The Foreign Office minister added: “We will ensure that we are able to put food on the tables, that is a real priority.”  On the medium and longer-term, he said the Government wanted to ensure “the UK is increasingly self sufficient in terms of good production, logistics chain – HGV drivers and so on.” I celand is not the only food business to raise a warning over the impact of CO2 shortages on Christmas.  This weekend, Ranjit Singh Boparan, the owner of Bernard Matthews and 2 Sisters Food Group, said the closure of two large fertiliser plants in Teesside and Cheshire due to a sharp rise in gas prices could mean “Christmas will be cancelled”.  CO2 is essential to the humane slaughter of livestock, extends the shelf life of products and is vital to cooling systems for refrigeration purposes, industry leaders have said. He said: There are less than 100 days left until Christmas and Bernard Matthews and my other poultry businesses are working harder than ever before to try and recruit people to maintain food supplies.” He said that “the gaps on the shelves” that he had warned about in July were “getting bigger by the day”. Boparan continued: “The supply of Bernard Matthews turkeys this Christmas was already compromised as I need to find 1,000 extra workers to process supplies. Now, with no CO2 supply, Christmas will be cancelled. A shortage of CO2 could cause food shortages in the run-up to Christmas, the managing director of Iceland supermarket has said. Richard Walker told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that suppliers who are looking at some of the stock they hold and their just-in-time chains are suggesting this “could become a problem over the coming days and weeks”. He said: “This is not an issue that is months away, that is for sure. We are building up our stocks on key lines like frozen meat just to make sure we can deal with any unforeseen issue. “At the moment we are fully stocked and our suppliers are OK, but we do need this sorted as quickly as possible.” F oreign Office minister James Cleverly said the energy price cap was not there for “preventing any increase in prices in perpetuity” ahead of a planned 12 per cent rise on October 1. He told Times Radio: “It was about making sure that those increases were modest, and predictable, and it’s doing exactly what it was designed to do. “It’s already protected hundreds of thousands of people from volatile energy prices and will continue to do so. It’s about making sure that people can budget and they know what’s coming, and it has done exactly what it was designed to do. “But, as I say, we will explore with the sector about how to make sure we protect the consumers of energy, both domestic and commercial, and also make sure we protect the long-term supply of energy to the UK.” B oris Johnson will push Joe Biden to change Covid-19 travel rules and let Britons fly to America when they meet on Tuesday in the White House for the first time. The Prime Minister will make an “impassioned” case for why the US President should lift his travel ban by allowing fully vaccinated people in the UK to travel directly into America. Mr Biden’s failure to ease restrictions – despite both leaders pledging to take action when they met at the G7 summit in June – has frustrated Whitehall and left UK businesses despairing. There will also be a push for Mr Biden to promise billions of dollars more in climate financing for developing nations to help Mr Johnson hit a flagship Cop26 UN climate conference target. T he Prime Minister flew to New York on Sunday, kick-starting a four-day US visit where he will attend the UN General Assembly before his first White House trip since entering Number 10 in July 2019. But there is plenty of drama back here in Westminster, with the Government scrambling to address the energy crisis – and questions about whether it could even lead to Christmas being cancelled (again).  📰The front page of tomorrow’s Daily Telegraph ‘Johnson to press US to open up for UK visitors’#TomorrowsPapersToday Sign up for the Front Page newsletter:https://t.co/UsfUCzx4yO pic.twitter.com/DawOsyTbjH We urge you to turn off your ad blocker for The Telegraph website so that you can continue to access our quality content in the future.
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Inclusive politics: Kerala CM Pinarayi Vijayan gets Congress leader K Muraleedharan’s pat …

Taking a dig at CPM, Muraleedharan said some Marxist leaders were not bothered about BJP’s efforts to make inroads into Kerala politics. FacebookTwitterLinkedin …
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Islamophobia penetrated politics in West, Erdoğan says | Daily Sabah

Anti-Muslim hatred and xenophobia, which disrupt the daily lives of Muslims, have taken politics ho…
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The far right's new focus on local politics, briefly explained – Vox

The far right’s new focus on local politics, briefly explained – Vox

We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audiences come from. To learn more or opt-out, read our Cookie Policy. Please also read our Privacy Notice and Terms of Use, which became effective December 20, 2019. On Saturday, a rally by supporters of former President Donald Trump came and went peacefully, with a heavy police and media presence and only a handful of arrests. Before the event, officials in DC were focused on preventing a repeat of January 6 — but more than eight months after the insurrection, far-right groups have shifted their focus to more local causes that could nonetheless have a major impact on national politics. According to Jared Holt, who researches domestic extremism for the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensic Research Lab, right-wing extremists like those who stormed the Capitol building were “scared shitless” of creating another event like January 6 on Saturday — to the point that several conservative leaders, including Trump, warned their followers to stay away from the rally, claiming it was a trap. Ultimately, only about 100 people showed up, according to an estimate by the Washingtonian’s Andrew Beaujon — far fewer than some pre-rally predictions — and the protesters were at times outnumbered by members of the media. Good morning from *that* rally at the Capitol everyone’s been talking about. We’re about an hour away from official start time, and unsurprisingly we’re working with a ratio of approx 10 media per attendee. A classic rock mash-up is playing over the sound system @VICENews pic.twitter.com/EywP6XidJe But anemic participation at Saturday’s event doesn’t reflect fading right-wing enthusiasm for Trump’s election lies — his supporters are just changing tactics, pushing to elect like-minded politicians and change state legislation to fit a false narrative of election fraud. “Many are instead … applying that political energy into local and regional scenes,” Holt told Vox’s Aaron Rupar last week. Specifically, that energy has manifested itself in a far-right push to intimidate current state and local election officials, many of whom played a major role in pushing back on Trump’s election fraud conspiracies in 2020, and to install a new wave of pro-Trump election officials. It’s a tactic that could have major implications for future US elections, and one that extremism experts have been raising the alarm about. “Going local, [far-right movement figures] suggest to each other, might also help solidify power and influence their movements gained during the Trump years,” Holt wrote in his Substack newsletter last week. “After all, few people are truly engaged in local politics. That’s a lot of influence up for grabs to a dedicated movement.” The local impact of Trump’s election lie has been most visible in some of the battleground states that swung to President Joe Biden in the 2020 election. In Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, for example, election officials from both parties have been deluged with harassment from Trump supporters, including explicit death threats. And it’s not a small-scale problem: Reuters has identified hundreds of similar threats all across the US, though the victims have found little recourse with law enforcement. The harassment has been so severe that about a third of all election workers now feel unsafe in their jobs, according to a poll conducted by the Benenson Strategy Group for the Brennan Center for Justice earlier this year. And as the New York Times reported on Saturday, there’s now a legal defense committee, the Election Official Legal Defense Network, specifically to support election officials facing harassment and intimidation. In many of the same states where officials have faced relentless harassment, far-right figures are also looking to put them out of a job. In Georgia, for example, Republican Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, who repeatedly defied Trump to confirm that Biden won both Georgia’s electoral votes and the 2020 election, will face a Trump-endorsed primary challenger, Rep. Jody Hice (R-GA). According to Politico, Hice voted against certifying the 2020 electoral college results in January, and he has continued to promote voter fraud lies since then. Just after Hice announced his bid in March, Trump issued a statement lauding Hice as “one of our most outstanding congressmen.” “Unlike the current Georgia Secretary of State, Jody leads out front with integrity,” Trump said in the statement. “Jody will stop the Fraud and get honesty into our Elections!” Hice isn’t the only secretary of state candidate to have embraced Trump’s election fraud rhetoric, either. Candidates like Mark Finchem in Arizona and Kristina Karamo in Michigan, both of whom have been endorsed by Trump, could have substantial oversight of how elections in those states are run if they win office, though actual vote counting is done by counties and municipalities. Finchem has parroted the claims of voter fraud and endorsed a spurious “audit” of the vote count in Arizona’s Maricopa County, the AP reports. Finchem, a current state representative, also admitted that he was at the Capitol on January 6, but claims to have stayed 500 yards away and that he didn’t know about the attack until later. Like Finchem, Karamo has also endorsed false election fraud claims: According to the Detroit News, she pushed voter fraud claims during the 2020 election, telling Michigan state senators that she witnessed two cases of election workers misinterpreting ballots to the advantage of Democrats, and she appeared alongside MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell at a June rally, spreading further unsubstantiated claims of election fraud. As Politico pointed out earlier this year, the actual power of secretaries of state varies by state, and is often more “ministerial” than anything — but the danger of pro-Trump election officials having a high-profile platform to espouse election conspiracies is very real. “There’s a symbolic risk, and then there’s … functional risk,” former Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson, a Republican, told Politico in May. “Any secretary of state who is a chief elections official is going to have a megaphone and a media platform during the election. A lot of the power is the perception of power, or that megaphone.” Candidates like Hice, Finchem, and Karamo all still have to win primaries and general elections — by no means a sure thing — if they want to become the top election officials in their states. But even without election conspiracists in secretary of states’ offices, some states, like Arizona and Pennsylvania, have already started chipping away at the framework of their states’ election laws. On Wednesday, the GOP-held Pennsylvania legislature’s Intergovernmental Operations Committee took another step toward a “forensic audit” of the 2020 election results like the one currently ongoing in Arizona when it voted to issue a subpoena for voter information — including information that’s typically not public, like the last four digits of voters’ Social Security Numbers. And in Arizona, where a bizarre “audit” of the 2020 election has already been shambling along for months, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey has also taken steps to limit the power of the Arizona’s Democratic secretary of state, Katie Hobbs. In June, Ducey signed a law stripping Hobbs of her power to defend the results of an election in court. “This is a petty, partisan power grab that is absolutely retaliation towards my office,” Hobbs, who is running for governor, told NPR. “It’s clear by the fact that it ends when my term ends,” she said. “It is at best legally questionable, but at worst, likely unconstitutional.” Democrats, though, are making some attempts to push back against the right’s attempts to subvert future elections. In August, the House passed the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, which would help restore the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) recently introduced her own voting rights bill, the Freedom to Vote Act, which is aimed at preventing the very election subversions the Republicans are trying to enact in multiple key states. That bill, however — like the Democrats’ previous voting rights legislation, the For the People Act — has essentially no chance of becoming law under current Senate rules, since the filibuster means it would require at least 10 Republican votes to pass. Senate Democrats could end the filibuster, or create a carve-out for voting rights legislation, using their simple 50-vote majority, but that path also appears unlikely thanks to continued opposition from Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV). And with efforts like these tied up in a deeply polarized Congress, Trump supporters peddling election fraud conspiracies can continue to make inroads in local races and legislation. “I don’t think we’ve ever been at a point that’s been quite this tenuous for the democracy,” Christine Todd Whitman, the former Republican governor of New Jersey and co-chair of the States United Democracy Center, told CNN last week. “I think it’s a huge danger because it’s the first time that I’ve seen it being undermined — our democracy being undermined from within.” In moments like this — as people grapple to understand variants and vaccines, and kids head back to school — many outlets take their paywalls down. Vox’s content is always free, in part because of financial support from our readers. We’ve been covering the Covid-19 pandemic for more than a year and a half. From the beginning, our goal was to bring clarity to chaos. To empower people with the information they needed to stay safe. And we’re not stopping. To our delight, you, our readers, helped us hit our goal of adding 2,500 financial contributions in September in just 9 days. So we’re setting a new goal: to add 4,500 contributions by the end of the month. Reader support helps keep our coverage free, and is a critical part of sustaining our resource-intensive work. Will you help us reach our goal by making a contribution to Vox with as little as $3?
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Politics of intolerance – Newspaper – DAWN.COM

JUST when the PTI government seemed comfortably ensconced in power it gratuitously opened new polit…
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BBC Politics on Twitter: “What is wrong with the phrase, “woman adult human female”? Liberal …

In deinem Browser ist JavaScript deaktiviert. Möchtest du mit dem klassischen Twitter weitermachen? Du kannst deine Tweets vom Web aus und über Drittapplikationen mit einem Standort versehen, wie z.B. deiner Stadt oder deinem genauen Standort. Du hast jederzeit die Möglichkeit, Standortangaben nachträglich zu löschen. Mehr erfahren Füge diesen Tweet zu deiner Webseite hinzu, indem du den untenstehenden Code einfügst. Mehr erfahren Füge dieses Video zu deiner Webseite hinzu, indem du den untenstehenden Code kopierst. Mehr erfahren Indem du Twitter Inhalte in deine Website oder App einbettest, akzeptierst du die Twitter Entwicklervereinbarung und die Entwicklerrichtlinien. Wenn du einen Tweet siehst, den du magst, dann klicke das Herz und zeige damit dem Verfasser, dass dir der Tweet gefällt. Der schnellste Weg, den Tweet eines anderen mit deinen Followern zu teilen, ist ein Retweet. Tippe auf das Symbol, um ihn sofort zu retweeten. Teile deine Gedanken zu einem Tweet ganz einfach in einer Antwort mit. Finde ein Thema, das dich interessiert, und leg direkt los. What is wrong with the phrase, “woman adult human female”? Liberal Democrat leader Sir Ed Davey says the phrase “doesn’t really encapsulate the debate… a trans woman is a woman, a trans man is a man” http:// bbc.in/3hM0Hvu   #Marrpic.twitter.com/XTFOychFTA Are you going to ask Alok Sharma about his views on the Trans issue, having asked both the Lib Dem and Labour interviewees? People in their 40s probably said the same thing during the mid 1960s when same sex relationships were decriminalised. Now it’s “normal” And the world hasn’t imploded, or at least hasn’t imploded due to same sex relationships Cutting through the bullshit. Well done Andrew. The Libs are for access to all spaces regardless of sex. Now ask @Keir_Starmer and people might actually be getting somewhere in deciding who to vote for. the issue is one of the most beautifully elegant active measures I have seen. it has split the lib dems, the snp, labour, found it’s way onto the statute book. remarkable. Twitter ist möglicherweise überlastet oder hat einen vorübergehenden Schluckauf. Probiere es erneut oder besuche Twitter Status für weitere Informationen.
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Inside Politics: 'Getting it all done is going to be a stretch' – The Independent

Inside Politics: ‘Getting it all done is going to be a stretch’ – The Independent

Boris Johnson is touching down in America for a bit of climate diplomacy – but he isn’t optimis…
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Faction politics take back seat in LDP leadership race as general election looms | The Japan Times

To enjoy our content, please include The Japan Times on your ad-blocker’s list of approved sites. T…
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Politics Professor Emeritus leads prestigious four-part lecture series – The Cavalier Daily …

When Brantly Womack, Professor Emeritus of Politics at the University of Virginia and Senior Faculty Fellow at the Miller Center, retired from his …
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Labour plans to raise £500m by closing fund managers' tax loophole | Politics | The Guardian

Labour plans to raise £500m by closing fund managers’ tax loophole | Politics | The Guardian

Labour has announced plans to raise almost £500m by closing a tax loophole enjoyed by a small numb…
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Festivals bring hopes of economic recovery but virus, politics could be spoilsports

Baburam Karki, owner of a men’s clothing shop at Watu, New Road, reached his store early Saturday m…
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Moot hails Sardar Mengal for principled politics, struggle for Balochistan’s rights

Speakers at a condolence conference on Sunday paid rich tributes to former Balochistan chief minist…
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Recent Events Are A Defining Moment in NH Politics – InDepthNH.orgInDepthNH.org

Recent Events Are A Defining Moment in NH Politics – InDepthNH.orgInDepthNH.org

By GARRY RAYNO, InDepthNH.org New Hampshire is a battle ground for the culture wars over COVID-19 …
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PIX on Politics roundtable: Experts weigh in on Rikers crisis | PIX11

PIX on Politics · As COVID closes classrooms, NYC councilman says ‘families deserve’ remote learning option · ‘People sleeping in filth, in feces’: Jumaane …
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Power & Politics: A conversation State Sen. Julia Salazar – News 12 Bronx

Power & Politics: A conversation State Sen. Julia Salazar. News 12 Staff. Sep 19, 2021, 10:11am. Updated on: Sep 19, 2021, …
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Adeleke: A life of philantropism and service — Politics – The Guardian Nigeria

Adeleke: A life of philantropism and service — Politics – The Guardian Nigeria

Senator Ademola AdelekeFor everything, it’s a season and for all human beings, there are various …
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Politics Chat: Police Out-Numbered Demonstrators At ‘Justice For J6’ Rally – NPR

NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the…
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Are we starting to mimic Middle East politics? – Las Vegas Sun News

Are we starting to mimic Middle East politics? By Thomas Friedman. Sunday, Sept. 19, 2021 | 2 a.m.. One day, 1,000 years from now, when they dig …
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On Politics: Mayor Rick Blangiardi's decisive 'no' to Haiku Stairs could be template for other …

On Politics: Mayor Rick Blangiardi’s decisive ‘no’ to Haiku Stairs could be template for other …

Rick Blangiardi, less than a year into his new job as Honolulu’s mayor, is showing that somet…
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Geneva Toils & Tamashas: Serial indictments and puerile Tamil letter-politics – The Island

by Rajan Philips The 48th Session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva that started proceedings…
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FOCUS: Faction politics wane in Japan party leader race as nat’l vote looms – Kyodo News

The outcome of Japan’s ruling party leadership race to choose the successor to Prime Minister Yoshi…
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Politics must not kill the Constitution – Washington Times

Politics must not kill the Constitution – Washington Times

Politics must not kill the Constitution Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, in remarks to studen…
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Concerns over delayed cabinet appointment in Edo — Politics – The Guardian Nigeria

[FILES] Obaseki. Photo/TWITTER/GOVERNOROBASEKIA year after Governor Godwin Obaseki won the keenly c…
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Sharad Pawar frowns over new language of politics | Deccan Herald

NCP chief Sharad Pawar on Saturday expressed disapproval about the “new type of discourse” in polit…
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NCP supremo Sharad Pawar frowns over new language of politics – The New Indian Express

NCP supremo Sharad Pawar frowns over new language of politics – The New Indian Express

MUMBAI: NCP chief Sharad Pawar on Saturday expressed disapproval about the “new type of discourse” …
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5 Reasons It’s Hard For Disabled People To Trust Politics And Activism – Forbes

Disabled people’s attitudes towards politics and activism are complicated. Distrust in politics i…
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SARAH VINE: The death of Boris’s mum reveals how inhumane our politics has become – Daily Mail

Such is the unforgiving culture of modern politics, with all the pressures of social media and the …
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