Ringside Politics – May 20th, 2019

Ringside Politics – May 20th, 2019

Welcome to another edition of Ringside Politics with Jeff Crouere. Today’s Hot Topics: 1) Fox News town hall with Mayor Pete. How did you feel about …
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Building the Brexit party: how Nigel Farage copied Italy’s digital populists

The former Ukip leader forged an alliance with the Five Star Movement just as they bulldozed Italian politics using a tightly controlled digital operation.
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Germany’s long-awaited antimissile program is about to face politics

COLOGNE, Germany, and ROME – The German government expects to receive a long-awaited industry off…
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ESPN President: 'Our Fans Do Not Want Us to Cover Politics'

ESPN President: ‘Our Fans Do Not Want Us to Cover Politics’

Pitaro has also satisfied ESPN’s more traditional fans by steering commentators away from politic…
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A new president wants to transform Ukraine’s politics — and stay out of America’s

The new European data protection law requires us to inform you of the following before you use our …
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Federal election 2019: Scott Morrison’s government on track for majority with 78 seats – politics live

Josh Frydenberg confirms that the government will be taking its tax rebates policy to the parliament as a whole package. Which includes reducing the …
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Golden protests 'gotcha politics' move by House leaders

Golden protests ‘gotcha politics’ move by House leaders

Upset by what he saw as “a cynical move” by congressional leaders, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jared G…
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Liina Siib’s “Politics of Paradise”

Liina Siib, Witches (detail), 2019, “Politics of Paradise” at Tallinn Art Hall, Tallinn, 2019 P…
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Did Anti-Abortion Activists Overreach in Alabama?

Hi. Welcome to On Politics, your guide to the day in national politics. I’m Lisa Lerer, your host…
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Tory party suspends Michael Heseltine for backing Lib Dems

Tory party suspends Michael Heseltine for backing Lib Dems

This is a betrayal of the younger generation, who are passionately opposed to taking them out of the centre of world politics. “Am I supposed to sneak …
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‘Politics isn’t going to wait for you’: has Change UK missed its moment?

Fighting an election sooner than intended, it is struggling in the polls – but Chuka Umunna insists the new party is on the up. by Jessica Elgot.
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From politics to pontoons as minister tries sailing

The deputy minister for culture, sport and tourism and helped launch Adventure Smart UK in Cardiff …
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Brexit: UK's inability to get past party politics 'extraordinary', says Coveney

Brexit: UK’s inability to get past party politics ‘extraordinary’, says Coveney

The inability of the British political system to see above party politics in relation to Brexit is …
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You can’t blame politics (or Brexit) for Britain’s Eurovision woe

Yes, Eurovision is political – but for 20 years now, this fact has been used as an excuse to …
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Politics explained: How Momentum grew up, from Corbyn fan club to policy powerhouse

Momentum is full of talented young people gaining their first experience of working in politics –…
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Rage, rapture and pure populism: on the road with Nigel Farage

Rage, rapture and pure populism: on the road with Nigel Farage

A feeling that politics is broken. A feeling, not just here in Wales, but everywhere, that there is a detachment between Westminster and ordinary folk.
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There’s more to Anne Lister than lesbianism – she was brave in politics too

Anne Lister is often referred to as the first modern lesbian, but, as Sarah Richardson explains, sh…
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Boris Johnson ‘RULES OUT’ alliance with Nigel Farage despite Brexit Party surge in poll

Mr Johnson, Conservative MP for Uxbridge and South Ruislip, announced he will take part in the lead…
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Winter is here: How 'Game of Thrones' took over American politics

Winter is here: How ‘Game of Thrones’ took over American politics

The world is still waiting to find out who ends up on the Iron Throne of Westeros, but in Washington, one thing is certain: “Game of Thrones” reigns supreme among lawmakers, candidates and much of the nation’s capital. The HBO series, based on the Song of Ice and Fire books by George R.R. Martin, has become required weekly viewing for the political world since its premiere in 2011. As the show nears its final episode on Sunday, the buzz surrounding the drama has grown hotter than dragon fire. And politicians from both sides of the aisle use the fantasy mega-hit’s shared cultural vocabulary to help make their points. President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump calls for Republicans to be ‘united’ on abortion Tlaib calls on Amash to join impeachment resolution Facebook temporarily suspended conservative commentator Candace Owens MORE has more than once sent out “Thrones”-inspired images and messages on his Twitter account, including warning Iran that “sanctions are coming,” a play on the Stark family’s famous “Winter is coming” house words. When Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenHere are the potential candidates still eyeing 2020 bids Sanders unveils education plan that would ban for-profit charter schools Warren policy ideas show signs of paying off MORE (D-Mass.) wanted to make a point about income inequality and entrenched power last month, she wrote an op-ed titled “The World Needs Fewer Cersei Lannisters.” “It’s a show that in its first five years really caught our attention by really defying storytelling convention,” says Anthony Gierzynski, professor and chair of the political science department at the University of Vermont. “Just when we think that the good guy or the side that we’re rooting for is going to get ahead, something horrible happens,” says Gierzynski, author of “The Political Effects of Entertainment Media: How Fictional Worlds Affect Real World Perspectives.” In the rollercoaster, often-topsy turvy world of Capitol Hill, that unpredictability could be strikingly relatable. Or maybe it’s the constant, bloody clashes and Machiavellian scheming that seem all too familiar. “In this age of intense polarization, in terms of rhetoric and the way partisans see the other side as a threat to the country, the story where that’s definitely the case in ‘Game of Thrones’ — that might really resonate. As well as the whole struggle for power,” says Gierzynski. “I think from the very beginning, it’s all about kingship,” says Jana Matthews. Five years ago, the English associate professor developed her own “Game of Thrones” course at Rollins College based on the book and TV series. The show, she says, “does just enough historically to cement its place in the world of fantasy and also the pre-modern world. You can enjoy it and analyze it critically from that end, that lens. But at the same time, it’s close enough to some moments to see patterns of contemporary American politics and political history that we are able to read it as an allegory.” The fictional series, which has set records for both legitimate viewership and bootleg pirating, has for years spilled into the real world when lawmakers and politicians seek to use it to connect with a wide audience. In 2014, then-Democratic House hopeful Seth MoultonSeth Wilbur Moulton2020 Dem Seth Moulton calls for expanding cannabis access for veterans Momentum builds behind push to pass laws enshrining abortion rights ‘SleepyCreepy Joe’ and ‘Crazy Bernie’: Trump seeks to define 2020 Dems with insults MORE rallied supporters in Massachusetts with a “Thrones” reference, tweeting, “Sorry Game of Thrones fans, we will not be settling the #ma6 election by trial by combat. Come knock doors this weekend instead!” Three years later, former House Speaker Newt GingrichNewton (Newt) Leroy GingrichMORE (R-Ga.) compared special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE ’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election to the headline-making series. “I think this is closer to ‘Game of Thrones’ than it is to anything normal,” Gingrich told Fox News’s Sean HannitySean Patrick HannityMSNBC host: Barr ‘the most dangerous person’ who works for Trump ‘SleepyCreepy Joe’ and ‘Crazy Bernie’: Trump seeks to define 2020 Dems with insults The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition – After GOP infighting, Trump Jr. agrees to testify again MORE . “This is a classic story of an outsider trying to reform an institution, and the institution, in this case the deep state doing everything it can to destroy the person who has usurped power,” Gingrich added, referring to Trump. Following the completion of Mueller’s probe, which did not find evidence to accuse the Trump campaign of conspiracy with Moscow, the president himself tweeted victory in a similar style to “Game of Thrones” promotional images. “Game over,” the April message read. HBO issued a statement following the tweet, saying, “Though we can understand the enthusiasm for ‘Game of Thrones’ now that the final season has arrived, we still prefer our intellectual property not be used for political purposes.” It’s unclear if Trump is actually a fan of the show. The White House didn’t return ITK’s request for comment about whether he’s among the millions of “Thrones” viewers. With a massive audience — last week’s penultimate episode raked in more than 18 million viewers in two airings — being clued into what’s happening in Winterfell or the Iron Islands might just make political sense. Former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyMomentum builds behind push to pass laws enshrining abortion rights Poll: Biden is only Dem candidate that beats Trump outside of margin of error ‘SleepyCreepy Joe’ and ‘Crazy Bernie’: Trump seeks to define 2020 Dems with insults MORE (D-Md.) doesn’t watch the show himself — although the 2020 White House hopeful’s staffers are big fans, we hear — but tweeted out a CNN story comparing him to “Thrones” character Eddison Tollett. “My staff tells me this is a good thing,” Delaney, a 2020 White House hopeful wrote. “Everyone liked Edd. They also tell me that we’re not renaming our Maryland HQ ‘Castle Black.’” Last month, at a Democratic leadership press conference, Rep. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesThe CASE Act is an opportunity for creators to have rights and remedies Dems struggle to make Trump bend on probes Black caucus leader Karen Bass finds herself in high demand MORE (N.Y.) said, “The founding fathers did not want a system where a king was in charge. Donald Trump appears to believe that he is a king. This is not Westeros. It’s Washington, D.C. ” But attempts to serve up some “Thrones” hot takes can backfire. Earlier this week, Warren, a 2020 presidential candidate, pushed back on talk that she revealed a “Game of Thrones” spoiler while discussing student loan debt during a speech in Philadelphia, quipping that “it’s a little hard to do a spoiler 21 hours after the program aired.” Dodging spoilers like Arya Stark avoiding falling walls in King’s Landing is John Dickerson’s mission ahead of Sunday. The “60 Minutes” correspondent and former “CBS This Morning” co-host counts him and his wife among “Game of Thrones’” watchers. The pair hasn’t seen the last three episodes because of work, but has hatched a gameplan in time for the finale. “We’re going to catch some shows Friday and Saturday to get caught up. We have largely remained spoiler-free somehow and so all of the upset, trouble and pain that people have been feeling we have in store for us before the final devastating blow on Sunday,” Dickerson tells ITK. “Winter is coming with the intensity of a Bouillon cube,” quips Dickerson. The show has, however, seen its share of backlash over the years — particularly during its final eighth season. Actress Jessica Chastain was among those who called out the series earlier this month for suggesting that the character of Sansa Stark, played by Sophie Turner, drew strength from her history of being a rape victim. ”Rape is not a tool to make a character stronger,” the “It: Chapter Two” star wrote to her more than 700,000 Twitter followers. Critics have also decried Emilia Clarke’s downward spiral in her role as Daenerys Targaryen from a fierce leader to a “mad queen” in the closing episodes. “Sadly, ‘Game of Thrones’ never fixed its problem with women,” a Thursday headline in USA Today read, with TV critic Kelly Lawler writing, “It’s painfully clear that ‘Thrones’ is a series created by (and in large part written for) men.” A Change.org petition to reshoot season 8 “with competent writers” had more than 870,000 signatures as of Friday afternoon. So how will Washington cope once someone finally claims the throne once and for all…and the show’s over? “I think we’ll do what we always do: you’ll run the narrative to the end of the watercooler and then we’ll move on to something else,” Matthews says with a laugh. “This has been a show that has transfixed the nation and transfixed the world and for really good reason,” the medieval literature expert adds. “I think it’s really given us some interesting things to think about and to analyze critically about ourselves and the world around us. But ultimately, we’ll move on to another show.” But what is dead may never die, and Dothraki or Valyrian speakers might not actually have to move too far from the series — HBO has said a prequel starring Naomi Watts is in the works. Former “Star Trek” actor George Takei had his own concerns about what’ll happen once the sun sets on the Seven Kingdoms for the last time. “I worry that after Game of Thrones ends, all our complaining is going to be redirected at the various Democratic candidates,” Takei wrote on Twitter on Thursday. “Keep it positive, friends.”
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The politics of television aren’t what you think they are, and 2020 candidates should pay attention

It may be hard to think of network television “upfronts” as an important political and societal…
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‘Entrenchment’ Review: The Politics of No Return

At some points in a democracy’s history, though, entrenchment isn’t just a principle of politics—it’s the dominant theme. “Democracies have two kinds …
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AEW Double Or Nothing 2019: Politics Already Rearing Its Ugly Head As Pac Vs. Adam Page Is …

AEW Double Or Nothing 2019: Politics Already Rearing Its Ugly Head As Pac Vs. Adam Page Is …

All Elite Wrestling ambitious upstart promotion has done just about everything right en route …
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Corbyn defends Labour’s bid for both leavers and remainers

Jeremy Corbyn has given a robust defence of Labour’s decision to try to appeal to both leavers and remainers in this Thursday’s European elections.
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ClandesTime 180 – The Politics of Monster Movies

Monster movies are one of the most beloved and distinctive genres in cinema, featuring a winning co…
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Joe Biden uses his campaign kickoff to argue Americans want unity

Joe Biden uses his campaign kickoff to argue Americans want unity

Democratic presidential frontrunner Joe Biden officially kicked off his 2020 campaign with a Saturd…
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And with that, a lifetime of Bill Shorten’s hopes and plans were gone

And then came, without any doubt, the toughest words of all. “This has been a tough campaign -…
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Eurovision: Madonna mixes politics with a classic hit during performance

(CNN) Madonna’s hugely anticipated performance during the Eurovision Song Contest in Israel drew plaudits from the crowd but raised eyebrows …
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When science and politics collide: Enhancing the FDA.

When science and politics collide: Enhancing the FDA.

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pik…
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The Country is Divided in Politics But Not in Who We Want to Win ‘Game of Thrones’

Republicans and Democrats alike can’t agree on much in American politics, but they can agree on Westerosi politics: They both want Jon Snow to …
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Johan Kristoffersson ‘sick’ of BoP ‘politics and playing’

Johan Kristoffersson blasted the ‘politics and playing’ in the FIA World Touring Car Cup paddoc…
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