England should beat Sri Lanka despite 'panic', says Michael Atherton

England should beat Sri Lanka despite ‘panic’, says Michael Atherton

Michael Atherton has backed England to hold their nerve and go 1-0 up against Sri Lanka despite a d…
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Scottish tech scores with innovative sports community mental wellness hub

Scottish tech startup Frog Systems has helped a top tier sports club launch its own bespoke mental …
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Sky Sports issue apology after Tottenham goal against Sheffield United

Sky Sports have apologised to viewers after announcing Tottenham had scored their opening goal…
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Sensational strike from Gundogan! (56)

Sensational strike from Gundogan! (56)

You need to be a Sky Sports subscriber to see the goals as they go in. If that’s you, please log in to watch. 0:28. Sorry! The video you are trying to …
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Fantastec is bringing global fans closer to the sports teams they cherish

Please be respectful when making a comment and adhere to our Community Guidelines. Coronavirus hit …
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NBC 5 Sports Podcast: Episode 48

It’s a busy week in DFW sports. Pat Doney is joined by 105.3 The Fan’s Bryan Broaddus to discuss the Cowboys’ new coaching hires and Brad …
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Sports on TV, January 18-24: NFL playoffs, NBA, NHL, golf, soccer, college basketball and more

Sports on TV, January 18-24: NFL playoffs, NBA, NHL, golf, soccer, college basketball and more

The following is a glance at sports on TV, including channels, radio listings and game times for lo…
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Olympic Sports Center, city of Bremerton reach agreement to allow soccer to continue

BREMERTON — Bremerton’s Olympic Sports Center will remain open for indoor soccer under phase 1 of the state’s coronavirus reopening plan after …
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Minor in Sports Marketing and Management

The Sports Marketing and Management Minor combines business as well as health and sports education …
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Yahoo Sports | Our Trusted Brands | Verizon Media

Yahoo Sports | Our Trusted Brands | Verizon Media

Partner with Verizon Media to connect with customers through Yahoo Sports, the #1 Fantasy Sports site with live local & primetime NFL games, plus …
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Contradictory HS sports rules leave many of us befuddled

We hope you enjoyed your free articles. Here is why you should subscribe and support The Day. At a moment of historic disruption and change with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and the calls for social and racial justice, there’s never been more of a need for the kind of local, independent and unbiased journalism that The Day produces. Please support our work by subscribing today. And so today we wrestle with this maddening paradox: High school sports have never been more popular in our state and country … and yet have never been managed with more contradiction and inconsistency. If we’ve learned nothing else in the last 10 months, we know this much: Truth is negotiable amid the perils of a pandemic. None of this is easy. Still, I believe that any optimism some of us harbored about a potential spring football season ultimately fell somewhere between gullible and quixotic. Worse, the dizzying layers of contradictory rules and ruminations from our fearless leaders leave many of us befuddled. The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference, the state’s governing body of high school athletics, nixed the whole spring football thing Thursday. At the core of executive director Glenn Lungarini’s comments on the issue came this pupu platter of old information about concussions and recovery periods for high school kids — and new information from the National Federation of State High School Associations. “One of the main limiting factors (in the NFHS guidance) was if you play spring football you reduced the number of games you play the following fall because of the exposure of concussions and contacts within the calendar year,” Lungarini said. “We anticipate being able to have a fall season next year. That was a significant consideration for the board (Thursday). “When you have the leading expert on interscholastic and youth sports, and their sport medicine advisory committee issued guidance to us for states considering spring football, it’s important you take that information and review its relevance.” Translation: The national governing board just issued an edict saying that football games in the spring would compromise the number of games played in the fall. We’re learning here, apparently, that NFHS just had an epiphany about recovery times for high school football players — and that CIAC officials have actually spent time discussing issues like recovery times among themselves. Example: A normal high school football season ends with state championship games on or about Dec. 10 here in Connecticut. Generally speaking, winter sports practices have already begun. And yet a football player, in the days after the state championship game — after enduring the full, physical nature of football since the middle of August — can jump right onto the wrestling mat and begin practicing. What, wrestling doesn’t require an appreciable amount of physicality, too? Are football players’ bodies truly ready to be tossed around on a mat like horseshoes at the family picnic after four months of football? But NFHS, with a presumably straight face, wants us to believe that we are endangering the health of kids by subjecting them to football in March and April, three months off and then practice again in August. I’m sure I’ve heard something dumber in my life. But honestly, it’ll take me a while to think of it. That is inconsistent. It is contradictory. It is absurd. It demands further review. It is why many of us remain suspicious as to the earnestness of the work being done here to guide the games our kids play. It’s not fun being so cynical. But what other conclusion is to be drawn here? Football seasons (one of which is abbreviated) three months apart are more dangerous than football and wrestling three days apart? Have they ever watched what is required of high school wrestlers? They need to be tougher than Clorox. COVID-19 numbers might have precluded a spring season from happening. I get that. I just find the timing of all this suspiciously convenient. It’s either an indictment of the leadership at NFHS or something for the CIAC to hide behind. Either way, the policy making here is woefully inconsistent. Normally, this is the time for an absorbing, “the kids deserve better.” Actually, we all do. But now when I think about the vision for high school sports both in the state and nationally, I think about one of my favorite bumper stickers: “Since I gave up all hope, I feel much better.” All of our stories about the coronavirus are being provided free of charge as a service to the public. You can find all of our stories here. Overdue bills, late holiday cards and stale Christmas cookies: Postal Service still sorting through unprecedented backlog Tipsters, tech-savvy kids, pharmacy hopping: How Americans are landing coronavirus vaccines QAnon note to Pence called evidence of ‘assassination’ plot before prosecutors walk back claim
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Player Ratings: Fulham 0-1 Chelsea | Premier League

Chelsea returned to winning ways in the Premier League after a hard-fought win at Craven Cottage, a…
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Chris Eubank Jr targets Gennadiy Golovkin: New world title masterplan explained

Chris Eubank Jr targets Gennadiy Golovkin: New world title masterplan explained

Chris Eubank Jr plans to lure Gennadiy Golovkin into a world middleweight championship fight in the…
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It’s been fantastic journey with Odisha Sports: Kushal Das

New Delhi [India], January 17 (ANI): All India Football Federation (AIFF) General Secretary Kushal …
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A Grip on Sports: Today’s action will run hot and cold, though it’s always a perfect 70 degrees in …

A GRIP ON SPORTS • If you like cold-weather football, today is the day for you. Or, if you like w…
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German sports doctor at centre of Operation Aderlass jailed

German sports doctor at centre of Operation Aderlass jailed

Mark Schmidt, the German sports doctor at the centre of the Operation Aderlass blood doping investi…
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Eight of Cumbria’s biggest sports stars

Here are just eight sportsmen and women who were raised in a Cumbrian town near you. Emlyn Hughes H…
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Billionaire Blavatnik lends $1bn to sports streaming venture

The billionaire owner of DAZN has lent the sport streaming group nearly $1bn (£740m) to support it…
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Barron: Even in hectic times, sports has a place on Houston newscasts

Barron: Even in hectic times, sports has a place on Houston newscasts

Editor’s note: This is the third of a multi-part farewell series by retiring Chronicle staff w…
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‘Disappointment’ as thieves raid £16000 of kit from town’s sports club

A town’s sports club faced a “tough few months” after two thieves raided more than £16,000 of cru…
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Sources: LeBron James Leaving Coke, Set To Sign Deal With Pepsi

LeBron James is preparing to join PepsiCo after a long-standing sponsorship with Coca-Cola, sources…
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Ubisoft delays "mass multiplayer outdoor extreme sports game" Riders Republic

Ubisoft delays “mass multiplayer outdoor extreme sports game” Riders Republic

Riders Republic – Ubisoft’s “mass multiplayer outdoor extreme sports game” for Xbox, PlayStation, a…
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Messi 360: The view from… Barcelona

The outcome of Barcelona’s presidential elections – scheduled to take place on January 24 – will ha…
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Time to dust of the antique winter sports equipment

It was lovely seeing children getting outdoors for some good playtime, however brief it lasted. The…
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'Unauthorised' encampment appears near Newport sports pitch

‘Unauthorised’ encampment appears near Newport sports pitch

An “unauthorised” encampment has appeared in the car park of a popular Newport sports ven…
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Syro’s New Photo Series Redefines Masculinity in Sports

Syro cofounders Henry Bae and Shaobo Han are on a mission to create heels for all. The two friends …
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Michigan high school basketball start date to be delayed after ‘non-contact sports’ decree

The MHSAA said it will adjust its state tournament schedules for these sports and announce new dates later this week. Competition for boys swimming …
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Indoor group exercise, non-contact sports can resume in Michigan on Jan. 16

Indoor group exercise, non-contact sports can resume in Michigan on Jan. 16

An exercise class is pictured in this Jan. 2020 file photo. (Anntaninna Biondo | MLive.com)Anntanin…
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Rangers fight multi-million pound ‘merchandise breach’ damages claim with Mike Ashley’s Sports …

And lawyers acting for the Newcastle United owner’s sports firm claimed yesterday that the club feared a supporter boycott if Sports Direct had won valuable merchandise rights. Mr Ashley, once a controlling figure at the club with a hold over its trademarks and merchandise and Rangers have been embroiled in various High Court litigations, centred on the merchandise deal, in London for more than two years. Yesterday it emerged that a company in the Sports Direct Group, SDI Retail (SDIR), is pursuing damages over an alleged breach of obligations under merchandise deals through the Commercial Court in London. In July, 2019, Judge Lionel Persey said that Rangers had breached the agreement with Sports Direct over the club’s kit deal. He ruled the Mr Ashley’s company should have been given the chance to match a shirt deal struck with Hertfordshire-based football merchandising firm Elite and sportswear firm Hummel thought to be worth £10m.  A damages hearing was expected to follow. READ MORE: Rangers due to pay nearly £450,000 in legal fees to Sports Direct in merchandise row The case revolves around Mike Ashley, who was a former Rangers shareholder and once seen as a club kinpin, striking a deal with a previous board that saw his company take in around 93p from every £1 made from the sale of strips and merchandise. That deal led to some fans boycotting Sports Direct stores and their sale of Rangers kit. At the end of 2014 the fans group, Rangers Supporters Trust launched an alternative shirt for fans as they took on Mr Ashley – and said all profits would be ploughed back into an increased shareholding in their club. The Herald revealed that in early 2015, Mr Ashley was declared the “ultimate controlling party” of Rangers Retail, a joint venture with the club which controlled the club’s merchandising and stores. When the venture was first confirmed by the club under then chief executive Charles Green in August 2012, it was promoted as enabling Rangers “to once again control its retail operation and give supporters the chance to buy direct from the club and in doing so, continue to invest in its future”. A campaign was subsequently launched in early 2015 by the Sons of Struth fans group as South Africa-based businessman Dave King moved to try and shift Mr Ashley’s influence at the club and one petition calling for a boycott of Sports direct attracted over 8000 signatures. And in March, 2015, Mr King and his so-called Three Bears associates including Paul Murray achieved a landslide victory at an extraordinary general meeting to control the boardroom while evicting associates of Mr Ashley, Derek Llambias and Barry Leach. That came after David Somers, who was chairman, and James Easdale had already resigned. Yesterday at the Commercial Court in London in a debate over what should be disclosed by both sides in the damages claim, Sa’ad Hossain for SDIR, told Judge Persey Rangers were requiring financial documents that would show the financial effect of any boycott of the club. He said: “Rangers say there are were some supporters who would not have bought kit in the relevant period from around July, 2018 in the event that SDIR acquired the offered rights because of antipathy to SDIR.” READ MORE: Rangers ‘will make payout to Mike Ashley’ over strips “This disclosure is contested as it is not to do with July, 2018, onwards, it is to do with the historical boycott that took place when the joint venture with [Rangers Retail] was in place, commencing around November, 2014. “As we understand, Rangers’ position is searches should be made of financial information of [Rangers Retail] going back to 2014 so that the impact of the boycott in 2014 can be determined. “And then in turn [they will] make inferences of a boycott in different circumstances relevant to the damages claim. “There are several reasons for thinking that this isn’t going to be a very informative exercise. “Firstly, the extent to which supporters boycotted kit in the past period may obviously be very different. “It is common ground that from 2018 onwards that Mr King and Mr Murray would have complied with their obligations which would have required them not to support a boycott of the goods. “Also Rangers was in a very different period during most of the boycott period. “The boycott started in November, 2014, and Rangers only returned to the Scottish Premiership at the end of the 2015/16 season. “In the period relevant to damages, Rangers is not only in the Scottish Premiership but competing in the Europa League. “We say it this is a fringe or unimportant issue.” Akhil Shah QC for Rangers, said it would be the “end of the issue” if monthly management reports for the retail operation were provided, adding that they were not sent regularly by Sports Direct. The Commercial Court ‘trial’ is expected to take 12 days and both sides have been arguing over the costs to be incurred. Sports Direct have said there is an agreement over its £299,400 costs budget for the ‘trial’. But it says its costs over the document disclosure procedure is disputed by the club. Mr Ashley’s firm says it should be £204,725, while the club wants to limit it to £157,400. SDIR told the court that an agreement was reached that Rangers costs’ for the disclosure procedure would be £314,402. Rangers had claimed around £319,000. In Judge Persey’s July, 2019 judgment, he said: “I am satisfied that [Sports Direct] was not only entitled to match the rights offered to Hummel/Elite but would have done so. “Those rights were not only not offered to them but Rangers… untruthfully asserted that Hummel had not been granted any Offered Rights and did not provide SDIR with a copy of the Elite/Hummel Agreement. “The upshot of all this is that Rangers, Elite and Hummel have until now performed and enjoyed the benefit of the Elite/Hummel agreement. At the end of June, 2018, Rangers had announced that Mr King’s dispute with Mr Ashley was over while confirming a new one-year kit deal with Ashley’s retail firm has been agreed. Mr King then hoped the deal would encourage supporters to end their kit sale boycott and provide a major financial boost as Rangers aim to challenge for the Scottish Premiership title. The damages case comes a year after Rangers won a separate battle with Sports Direct centred on the terms of an injunction aimed at preventing further breaches of the original agreement between Rangers and SDIR. The case continues.
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New Jersey continues run of sports betting records

SportBusiness is the most trusted global intelligence service, providing unique news, analysis, dat…
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