Review: Dirty Dusting − saucy stage comedy at its best

Review: Dirty Dusting − saucy stage comedy at its best

The touring comedy play is about three cleaners of a certain age who start a telephone sex line and…
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Vacation Simulator Books a Holiday to PSVR This Summer

Owlchemy Labs saw a great deal of early success on virtual reality platforms with its comedic adven…
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What’s on the big screen this week

SEVERAL pieces of the Marvel puzzle will fall into place with today’s release of Captain Marvel. The stand-alone superhero film tells the origin story of Carol Danvers and how she became the person Nick Fury turned to at the end of Avengers: Infinity War after Thanos wiped out half the universe. Set in the 1990s, the film is set to a quirky soundtrack from the decade and Brie Larson manages to capture Danvers’ cheeky sense of humour as well as her super-powered strength.  Plus fans will find out how Fury got his eye patch and how the Avengers got their name. Fans are also rejoicing that Marvel didn’t feel the need to include a distracting romantic subplot. Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem also star in the Spanish mystery drama Everybody Knows, from the writer/director of A Separation. Here are this week’s highlights of the big screen and why you should see them:   Captain Marvel (M) Carol Danvers is a former US Air Force fighter pilot whose DNA fused with that of a Kree during an accident, leading her to question her past when Earth is caught in a galactic war between two alien races. Why you should see it: Marvel’s first stand-alone female superhero film is well worth the wait, balancing action, humour and world building with a serious side of sass. Read the review. Everybody Knows (M) Laura, a Spanish woman living in Buenos Aires, returns to her hometown outside Madrid with her two children to attend her sister’s wedding. However, the trip is upset by unexpected events that bring secrets into the open. Why you should see it: This Spanish mystery may not have as much intrigue as it should, but its two leads do their best with an uneven story. Continuing King of Thieves (M) A true crime film about a crew of retired crooks who nearly pull off a major heist in London’s jewellery district. Why you should see it: What might have been an interesting study of human frailty, as old grudges resurface and self-interest causes the whole enterprise to implode, eventually runs out of puff – a bit like the characters themselves. Read the review. Greta (MA 15+) A young woman befriends a lonely widow who’s harbouring a dark and deadly agenda towards her. Why you should see it: Isabelle Huppert commits herself fully to the role of sexagenarian psychopath – audiences would expect no less – but not even her promising partnership with co-star Chloe Grace Moretz can transcend an uninspired screenplay. Read the review. A Dog’s Way Home (PG) A female dog travels four hundred miles in search of her owner throughout a Colorado wilderness. Why you should see it: This heart-warming adventure film is cute but never rises above mediocrity. Stan & Ollie (PG) Laurel and Hardy, the world’s most famous comedy duo, attempt to reignite their film careers as they embark on what becomes their swan song – a gruelling theatre tour of post-war Britain. Why you should see it: Steve Coogan and John C. Reilly take the bromance to a whole other level in this Laurel and Hardy biopic. Read the review. Vox Lux (MA 15+) This film follows the rise of Celeste from the ashes of a major national tragedy to pop super stardom. The film spans 18 years and traces important cultural moments through her eyes, starting in 1999 and concluding in 2017. Why you should see it: A bejewelled Natalie Portman soars in this probing look at the temptations and pitfalls of modern celebrity. Read the interview. Alita: Battle Angel (M) Alita, a cyborg who has no memory of who she is, slowly discovers that she contains powerful ancient technologies that were thought to have been lost. Why you should see it: Three-hundred-year-old cyborg Alita has the mind of a teenage girl, the idealised body of a gym junkie, and the eyes of a doe. She’s barely complex enough to sustain a tub of popcorn. Read the review. What Men Want (M) When Ali is passed up for a promotion, she questions what else she needs to do to succeed in a man’s world… until she gains the ability to hear men’s thoughts. Why you should see it: This gender-swapping remake is very likeable, in large part due to dynamic leading lady Taraji P Henson. Happy Death Day 2U (M) Tree Gelbman finds she’s reliving the same day repeatedly after being hunted and killed by a masked assailant. Why you should see it: This fast-paced sequel builds on the darkly funny tone of the original, having more fun with its dangerous wrinkle in time. Read the interview with Israel Broussard.
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