Vaanku to be released on January 29

Vaanku to be released on January 29

“Gender plays a big part in the film. It also has a beautiful message and explores a myriad of emotions associated with family, humour, emotions, …
See all stories on this topic

10 British movies we can’t wait to see in 2021

Despite the chaos caused to the movie industry by the coronavirus pandemic, 2020 was still a big year for British films. But 2021 is already shaping up to be just as strong. Admittedly we can’t predict exactly what will happen — there could well be more pandemic-induced delays to come — but for the time being we’ve picked out some of the films we’re most looking forward to this year. From the ghostly humour of Blithe Spirit to whodunnit mystery of Death on the Nile, here are 10 of them… There aren’t many stories out there that still get told 80 years later. Starting life as a play by Noël Coward back in 1941, Blithe Spirit — a comedy about a writer being haunted by the ghost of his dead wife — is set to return with an all-star cast this year, and frankly we can’t wait. Dan Stevens stars as crime author Charles Condomine, Leslie Mann is his former wife Elvira, and Judi Dench pops up as Madame Arcati, the medium who leads the fateful seance. Oh, and fans of cult British comedy Green Wing will even spot Julian Rhind-Tutt reprising his dry sense of humour in the part of Charles’ friend Dr Bradman. Splendid news. How to watch: On Sky/NOW TV Jan. 15 in the UK, in theatres and VOD Feb. 19 in the U.S. A modern-day version of Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist, with Michael Caine as Fagin and Lena Headey as the villain?! Sign us up. And yes, OK, the concept of a graffiti-tagging Oliver who’s well versed in parkour does seem a little bit out there, but it’s so ridiculous that it just might work. And even if it doesn’t, we’ll still be tuning in to find out. How to watch: On Sky/NOW TV Jan. 29 in the UK, U.S. release date TBC. A film about an amateur archaeologist might not sound like a thrill a minute, but when the movie in question stars Ralph Fiennes, Carey Mulligan, and Lily James, it becomes a whole lot more intriguing. The story — based on a John Preston novel which was in turn inspired by real events — is set against a WWII backdrop and involves a historic discovery of an ancient ship burial. Mike Eley’s cinematography already looks stunning from the trailer alone, and we’re excited to see this cast deliver presumably well-crafted dialogue from Jane Eyre screenwriter Moira Buffini. How to watch: Streaming on Netflix Jan. 29. Based on an award-winning West End musical of the same name that was inspired by a 2011 documentary, Everybody’s Talking About Jamie follows 16-year-old Jamie New (Max Harwell), who wants more than anything to become a drag queen. From its stage success as well as the looks of the trailer, expect big musical numbers mixed with moments of poignancy, as well as some notable supporting roles from Catastrophe’s Sharon Horgan and the always-entertaining Richard E. Grant. The film was meant to hit theatres Feb. 26 after having already been pushed back from a 2020 autumn premiere, and has now reportedly been pulled from 20th Century Studios billing by Disney. So sit tight for this one. How to watch: In theatres, release date TBC. Anya Taylor-Joy (of The Queen’s Gambit fame) stars opposite Game of Thrones’ Dean Charles-Chapman in this coming-of-age drama about a group of Dublin teenagers navigating a world of drinking, drugs, and violence. Written and directed by Eoin Macken and based on Rob Doyle’s novel of the same name, this one looks like a trippy mesh of Trainspotting and This is England. How to watch: In theatres March 21. No Time to Die was one of the biggest movie casualties of last year, being delayed not once but twice and leaving a fractured publicity run and a trail of shuttered cinemas in its wake. With a new release date set for Apr. 2, we’ll see if this actually happens this time. James Bond’s last outing in Spectre received mixed feedback from both critics and audiences, but with director Cary Joji Fukunaga at the helm and the additions of Lashana Lynch, Ana de Armas, and Rami Malek — not to mention Phoebe Waller-Bridge joining the writing team — we’re still looking forward to what the next 007 chapter has to offer. How to watch: In theatres Apr. 2. Admittedly, there’s not a lot we know yet about Last Night in Soho. But what we do know is enough to get us psyched. It’s directed by Edgar Wright, of Scott Pilgrim and Cornetto Trilogy fame; it stars an absolutely top-notch cast that includes Anya Taylor-Joy, Thomasin McKenzie, and Matt Smith; and it’s described as a time-traveling psychological horror film set in the 1960s. What all of that adds up to, we can’t wait to find out.* — Angie Han, Deputy Entertainment Editor How to watch: In theatres Apr. 23. With a cast this strong it would be frankly irresponsible of us not to include Death on the Nile on this list. Gal Gadot, Armie Hammer, Letitia Wright, and Rose Leslie are just some of the big names in Kenneth Branagh’s adaptation of the Agatha Christie classic, which revolves around the murder of an heiress on a luxury cruise ship. Expect lingering looks, glitzy outfits, and hidden secrets aplenty.  How to watch: In theatres Sept. 17. Benedict Cumberbatch and Claire Foy lead a solid cast in this drama based on the life of British artist Louis Wain, whose popular cat paintings helped him rocket to fame back in the 19th century. The film would be worth watching for Cumberbatch’s moustache alone (just look at that beauty), but when you add that to the cast (Birdman’s Andrea Riseborough and Sex Education’s Aimee Lou Wood join the two leads, among many others) and the presence of Flowers creator Will Sharpe in the role of director/writer, it becomes a must-see. How to watch: In theatres, date TBC. With the arrival of His House, Host, and Saint Maud, 2020 was an excellent year for British horror. But 2021 is already shaping up well. Christopher Smith’s The Banishing looks like a classic haunted house story, with Downton Abbey’s Jessica Brown Findlay playing a reverend’s wife in the 1930s who moves into a new (and most definitely ghost-riddled) house. Cue creepy comments from her daughter, occult whisperings, and some fairly unnerving figures in black robes. We can’t wait. How to watch: Streaming on Shudder, date TBC. *This show writeup also appeared on a previous Mashable list.
See all stories on this topic

Italian deli owner combines Brexit and Covid humour

An Italian delicatessen owner is (jokingly) asking customers to form two queues outside the shop in…
See all stories on this topic