Azekah Daniel left a talk show crying, 'comedian don't understand' – BOL News

Azekah Daniel left a talk show crying, ‘comedian don’t understand’ – BOL News

loading…. Azekah Daniel, a stunning and attractive Pakistani actress and model who debuted in the industry in 2015, is now regarded as one of the country’s best actors. Azekah Daniel recently shared on her official Twitter account the reason for leaving a talk programme. When explaining her reasoning, Azekah said that one should have a sense of humour and understand the difference between humour and mocking another person. “ So today I walked out of a show because some comedians clearly don’t understand the difference between humour or degrading someone. Tears rolled down as I left the set full of people. Jokes are meant to be funny not hurt someone’s feelings”, she wrote. So today I walked out of a show because some comedians clearly don’t understand the difference between humour or degrading someone. Tears rolled down as I left the set full of people. Jokes are meant to be funny not hurt someone’s feelings. The online community echoed Azekah’s sentiment, saying that no one has the right to degrade another person for the sake of humour. Catch all the Entertainment News, Lollywood News, Television News, Trending News, Breaking News Event and Latest News Updates on The BOL News ‘Silence from Bollywood stars is deafening’ Mehwish Hayat points out amid floods
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Azekah Daniel Walked Out Of A Talk Show Crying – Reviewit.pk

Azekah Daniel is a stunning and beautiful Pakistani actress and model who started her showbiz journ…
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Book Review: No holds barred and plenty of humour in essays on love – Irish Examiner

In ‘The Crane Wife: A memoir in essays’, author CJ Hauser offers a series of vignettes on her love life and association with love. CJ HAUSER was about to get married but she called it off and now she has written about the many facets of love in a deeply personal and vivacious memoir. To call it a book about her love life might conflate the wonders of her loves and of her life, especially as she is a writer busily elbowing her way out of restrictive definitions as much as getting out of restrictive situations and relationships. No essay is as chopped and intercut as the opening one that skips between the generations to give us fascinating fragments that illuminate the history of her family. Even in this section she gives us an eye-wateringly funny picture of the first time she sleeps with a guy. It happens at his house when they are in their teens on an afternoon when he thought nobody else would be home.  But his mother arrives outside the door and calls out, “What are you doing in there?”, to which he replies: “Playing Scrabble.” Gamely, the mother presses on and asks who is winning? Her son replies: “Both of us.” In another moment that just bounces off the page she describes her fashion-proud sister committing the greatest act of love by wearing a not-great combination of green sweater and navy skirt even though she hates the colour green. Why? Because her boyfriend is colour-blind and, “… to Doug this looks like navy and red… And nautical colors are really in right now.” From there, the essays become more intensely introspective as she focuses on what she is looking for and what she feels is missing. While this is her primary approach, she is not without burning one or two people from her past. A bit like the legend of the young Joni Mitchell’s ex-lovers wondering how they’d fare in her next lyric, some of Hauser’s exes appear to be fair game here. And in fairness, she could not have written this kind of book in a vacuum: “I am porous to the world, a kind of joyful sponge for the affectations and interests of the people I love. It has been the work of my life to build slightly firmer boundaries around myself so that I can figure out where I end and the people I love begin.” She scrutinises her own neediness, performs autopsies on old relationships, tries to “science the shit out of my love life”, gives Tinder and passionate one-night stands a whirl, and even considers stepping back from it all for a life minding dogs and becoming a “dog nun”. She analyses a film which she wittily describes as her Rorschach Blot and does the same with a TV series. Lately she wonders if she should look for something that might seem slow and boring instead of the “dramatic, storified kind of love” that always attracted her. It is tempting to finish the review with reference to a beautiful essay about the love between herself and her father and the oomph in the last line in this last essay but it might be better to whet the appetite with the wonderful, wobbling incongruities in the opening line of the title essay which make it hard not to read on: “Ten days after I called off my engagement I was supposed to go on a scientific expedition to study the whooping crane on the Gulf Coast of Texas.” If that is an opener that leaves you with an un-scratchable itch to find out where the hell that essay goes then this one’s for you. Sign up for Scene & Heard, our dynamic weekly arts and culture newsletter curated by the Irish Examiner Arts Editor. Music, film art, culture, books and more from Munster and beyond…….curated weekly by the Irish Examiner Arts Editor. © Irish Examiner Ltd, Linn Dubh, Assumption Road, Blackpool, Cork. Registered in Ireland: 523712.
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