A return to 'nasty' politics: Politics Weekly podcast

A return to ‘nasty’ politics: Politics Weekly podcast

Heather Stewart and Peter Walker discuss the latest on the vaccine rollout and universal credit. Severin Carrell examines the upcoming Scottish …
See all stories on this topic

Former Del. Gov. Mike Castle ’61 Speaks on Election, US Politics

Mike Castle ’61 addresses an Alumni College session, A Life in Politics, during 2011 Reunion Weekend. As the event took place on the eve of Joe …
See all stories on this topic

Kamala Harris’ Historic Inauguration Begins New Chapter In US Politics

WASHINGTON (AP) — For more than two centuries, the top ranks of American power have been dominate…
See all stories on this topic

Covid-19: plans to resume special education postponed

Covid-19: plans to resume special education postponed

With levels of Covid-19 infection still at an all-time high, the Government failed to get teaching …
See all stories on this topic

Essential Politics: Kamala Harris enters the room

Good morning, everyone, and happy Inauguration Day for those who celebrate. I’m Noah Bierman, and…
See all stories on this topic

Domestic Politics Took Bigger Hit Than International Under Trump: Eurasia Group’s Levy

Please make sure your browser supports JavaScript and cookies and that you are not blocking them fr…
See all stories on this topic

Politics? Golf? Media? What's next for Donald Trump

Politics? Golf? Media? What’s next for Donald Trump

Will Trump stay in politics? Before the Capitol riot, it looked like Trump would remain the apple of the eye of the Republican Party or at least a kingmaker …
See all stories on this topic

FX Daily: Italian politics to remain a low impact story

FX Daily: Italian politics to remain a low impact story · USD: Security concerns to dominate inauguration day · EUR: Italian government alive, but reshuffle …
See all stories on this topic

BBC Politics on Twitter: “”Turning the page on the dark chapter of Trump’s presidency… is also the …

“Turning the page on the dark chapter of Trump’s presidency… is also the responsibility of those in the Tory Party who cosied up to Donald Trump,” …
See all stories on this topic

In Joe Biden's White House, sports and politics may retreat to their own corners

In Joe Biden’s White House, sports and politics may retreat to their own corners

THROUGH PERSONAL TRAGEDY, a 36-year Senate career and two terms as vice president, Joe Biden has viewed athletes and athletic competition …
See all stories on this topic

The Sunday Show: BBC Scotland launches new politics programme

Martin Geissler and Fiona Stalker will host the new TV and radio show These adverts enable local bu…
See all stories on this topic

The Light Is Finally Flooding Back Into American Politics

We did it, Joe. Donald Trump has left the White House. The divorce is finalized. Washington has bee…
See all stories on this topic

Column: Politics and dinner parties are no longer a classic pairing

Column: Politics and dinner parties are no longer a classic pairing

Georgia saved me. Not the state. The person. It’s not easy these days, trying to be all bright ey…
See all stories on this topic

What shifting US politics means for China

Four years ago, real estate developer and self-described political outsider Donald Trump raised the…
See all stories on this topic

As Trump’s top diplomat, Pompeo sought to position himself as the president’s successor

Politics · Impeachment · Coronavirus · U.S. News · Opinion · Business · World. As Trump’s top diplomat, Pompeo sought to position himself as the …
See all stories on this topic

US politics live updates: Trump announces an end to some coronavirus travel bans, but Biden …

US politics live updates: Trump announces an end to some coronavirus travel bans, but Biden …

The FBI is investigating whether a woman who has been charged with breaking into the US Capitol Building stole a laptop from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office and tried to sell it to Russia. We’re going to wrap things up here today folks. The blog machine is going to have a nice little rest before Pete wakes it up at 6:00am AEDT for a mammoth session of non-stop blogging until after the inauguration is done and dusted on Thursday our time.  So I’ll catch you all tomorrow, for Donald Trump’s final full day as US president. We’re expecting about 100 presidential pardons, and there could be more executive orders on the cards before he leaves office.  Just popping back in here to clarify, I was making a joke about caramello koalas being CRIMINALLY DELICIOUS, not suggesting Shaun Micallef is also an outlaw bushranger.  The news is slowing down as the LITTLE hand is past 12 across much of the United States. Here’s what happened on Monday, US time: Among the executive orders Donald Trump has been signing in his last few days in office, there’s one about the creation of a “National Garden of American Heroes” — essentially a park full of statues of prominent Americans. This is an update to an idea we already knew about. It includes more figures that Trump wants to be honoured in this proposed garden, including Whitney Houston, Grover Cleveland and Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek. His list already included the likes of Kobe Bryant, Johnny Cash and several former US presidents. Check out the full list in Trump’s executive order here. Ruth Bader Ginsburg is also on the list — though I can’t establish whether she and her former Supreme Court colleague Antonin Scalia were already included before this update.  During the dress rehearsal for Wednesday/Thursday’s inauguration (Wednesday US time, Thursday if you’re here in Australia), the Capitol complex went into a temporary lockdown after a fire in a nearby homeless camp.  About a mile away from the capitol, a plume of smoke sparked security concerns and prompted a brief lockdown. Some participants were even evacuated from the Capitol. Local firefighters put out the blaze quickly and law enforcement officials said there was no threat to the public and the fire was not believed to be a threat to the inauguration. But that fast decision to lock down paints us something of a picture of the tension levels in the US Capitol right now.  In news just in, Riley June Williams has been arrested after her ex-partner alleged she took a laptop from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office during the US Capitol riot with the intention to send it to Russia.  The FBI said in an arrest warrant on Sunday that Williams hadn’t been charged with theft but only with illegally entering the Capitol and disorderly conduct. FBI officials said someone claiming to be an ex of Williams said friends showed him a video of her taking a laptop computer or hard drive from Pelosi’s office. The caller alleged that Williams intended to send the device to a friend in Russia who planned to sell it to the foreign intelligence service, but that plan fell through and she either kept or destroyed it. The FBI says the matter remains under investigation. The Justice Department says she has now been arrested. We don’t have a court date for Williams yet.  Nope, the electoral college does not include those six US territories (Puerto Rico, Guam, the US Virgin Islands, Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa, and the US Minor Outlying Islands). But citizens in those territories who also have official residency in a US state or Washington DC can vote by absentee ballot or travel to their state to vote. Great question. Pew Research Center published this list of presidential pardons in November last year, showing Donald Trump had used his powers of clemency less than any other modern president. (Reminder: clemency includes pardons and commutations. Pardons forgive past crimes and restore civil rights, and commutations completely or partially reduce sentences for those in prison or on community supervision.) That report found Barack Obama granted clemency 1,927 times during his eight-year tenure, including 212 pardons and 1,715 commutations. George W Bush issued 189 pardons and 11 commutations, and Bill Clinton clocked up 396 pardons and 61 commutations.   You may remember, there were 29 pardons issued just before Christmas, so that brings Donald Trump’s tally so far to 49. Which means another 100 or so tomorrow still doesn’t put him in front of his most recent predecessors.  It’s unclear. Basically this depends on your interpretation of the 12th and 22nd amendments. The 22nd amendment restricts a candidate from being elected to the presidency for more than two terms, while the 12th amendment dictates that essentially, the rules around being president also apply to the vice-president. But there’s debate around whether that 12th amendment refers to the eligibility requirements for president or simply serving as president (ie. being 35, and a natural-born citizen, as set out in the constitution). So some argue there’s a loophole that would allow a former two-term president to be elected VP. It’s never been tested. Here’s another handy explainer from earlier today. Our colleague Sophie Meixner has taken a good look at what will happen with Donald Trump’s US-Mexico border wall now that he is leaving office.  The “big, beautiful wall” was a centrepiece of Trump’s election campaign, and he will leave office this week with the project less than half complete according to his initial specifications.  As for Joe Biden’s plans, he has stopped short of pledging to tear it down. So what happens to the partially-built sections and the construction contracts? Have a read for more detail on the border wall.  In case you missed this earlier, our excellent colleague Peta Fuller has put together everything we know about Donald Trump’s plans for inauguration day.  We already know Trump will be the first sitting president to skip their successor’s inauguration since Andrew Johnson in 1869, who incidentally was the first US president to be impeached by the House. Dive in for more detail on what we know about the soon-to-be former president’s plans. Joe Biden and Kamala Harris’s swearing-in day may not look the same as inaugurations past, but they’re finding new ways to mark the occasion. In place of the hundreds of thousands expected to have turned out for the inauguration, the inaugural committee installed a “Field of Flags” on the national mall. Earlier this evening in DC, they lit up the installation with 56 pillars of light representing the 50 states and six US territories. The pillars lit up for 46 seconds — marking the 46th President of the United States Joe Biden. Hi Jane. Yep, I can see all the questions and comments that have been submitted to this blog today, so I’ll do my best to keep up with answering the most frequently asked and not-already-answered Qs. (There are more than 300 as I type!)  There were two US Capitol police officers who died in the days following the January 6 riot. One was Brian Sicknick, who died of injuries sustained during the unrest, and the other was Howard Liebengood. The US Capitol Police statement confirming Liebengood’s death on January 9 did not specify the cause. His family told the Washington Post he died by suicide, and was on duty at the capitol on the day of the riot. I’m going to do a bit more digging on the Melania question. There seems to be some differing reports of whether that $US20,000 spousal payment is for all ex-presidential spouses or just widows. So I’ll get back to you… But I can tell you that Melania’s secret service detail would expire if she were to divorce Donald.  There’s no limit to the number of times one person can serve as Vice-President.     We heard yesterday that the FBI had been assisting the National Guard in vetting thousands of troops who’d been deployed to DC to help out during the inauguration, over concerns of a potential “insider threat”.  The latest update is from the acting Pentagon chief, who said vetting was “normal for military support to large security events” and that there was currently “no intelligence indicating an insider threat”. Acting Defense Secretary Christopher Miller also said security agencies would be “leaving no stone unturned in securing the capital.” He added that he appreciated “the support of the FBI in assisting with this task and for each of the more than 25,000 Guardsmen”. That initial report about the FBI helping out with screening of those National Guard troops did not identify any specific plots to attack the inauguration events. But of course, security has been significantly bolstered in the wake of the US Capitol assault on January 6. You certainly can, Not Michael’s Mum. This is the latest analysis from former US correspondent and ABC News Breakfast host Michael Rowland.  He writes, chaos is defined as a situation without order or organisation, and this pretty much sums up the past four years. The shambles began within hours of Trump taking the oath of office in January 2017, when, instead of getting down to governing, the newly sworn-in president went on the warpath over the media “misrepresenting” the size of his inauguration crowd (fact check: it didn’t). From there it was a presidency by whim, with policy often made on the run via Trump’s (up until recently) vociferous Twitter feed. When he wasn’t tweeting, he was creating endless controversy by going on the fly at media conferences and other public appearances. Whether it was threatening to unleash “fire and fury” on North Korea over its nuclear program, undermining US intelligence agencies while standing alongside Russia’s President Vladimir Putin, or simply refusing to accept the results of the 2020 election, Trump all too often appeared prepared to put his own interests ahead of America’s. Goooood afternoon blog readers. It looks like Pete has been blasting through the questions today, but by all means, keep them coming and I’ll do my best to find you the answers.  In the meantime, we’ve got an update on Donald Trump’s pardons list. The Associated Press has now joined other US media outlets in reporting some of the people expected to receive pardons and commutations on Trump’s last day in office. And yep, Lil Wayne is on the list.  The rapper pleaded guilty last month to possessing a loaded, gold-plated handgun when his chartered jet landed in Miami in December 2019. He faces a sentence of up to 10 years in prison. In case you were wondering, Lil Wayne was a vocal Trump supporter during the 2020 presidential campaign. Exhibit A:  AP has also confirmed two sources familiar with the pardon discussions said Trump appears to have been dissuaded from pardoning himself or his family members.  The list is also not expected to include Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, or former White House adviser Steve Bannon.  There had been some speculation that Australian Wikileaks founder Julian Assange might receive a reprieve, but AP sources said he is not expected to be on the pardon list.  But lucky for you, the legend that is Lucy Sweeney is joining you in the blog for the afternoon! So don’t go anywhere, she’s got much better taste in television than me. I hope you enjoyed that bumper round of questions this afternoon. We’ll still get to as many as we can in the coming days but the news is likely to get a bit more hectic from here out. I’ll be back a bit earlier tomorrow morning, about 6:00am AEDT. It’ll be Trump’s final full day in office, Biden’s first in DC since he won the election, and there’s the little issue of those pardons that could drop at any time. Basically they’re the person who acts as the president of the Senate when the vice-president isn’t around. It’s mostly an administrative role (they just preside over the Senate to make sure the rules are enforced) but on rare occasions, they’ve got a lot of power. Like being fourth in line to the presidency! The title normally goes to the longest-serving senator of the party with the majority. I heard that Senator Hawley was being implored to resign for his sedition resulting in the Jan 6th events, any further word on this? Which state is he from and if he did resign would the Republicans get to fill his position like a casual vacancy in Australia or would there be a by-election? He certainly is being pressured to resign. But Hawley hasn’t given any indication he’s going anywhere, and it’s unlikely he’ll be forced out of office. As a Senator from Missouri, if his seat became vacant it’d be filled by the Governor, not a special election (which are basically what we call by-elections). Probably a couple of thousand at best. That’d include the members of Congress and their guests, VIPs (like former presidents) and other staff. There won’t be crowds. Biden has told people to stay away. Washington DC is locked down. There might be a few DC locals popping down to the barricades for a sticky beak, or a protest here or there, but that’s about it. It’s a quick process! The Bidens move into the White House the day of inauguration. They’ll spend the night before inauguration in Blair House, the guest house of the president in Washington DC. I pointed to the comments of Democratic House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer the other day as the best explanation for why Democrats are pushing ahead, so I’ll do it again! Here’s what Hoyer said in the closing speech before the impeachment vote began: “With just seven days left in the President’s term, this vote is not about timing.  It is about principle.  It concerns the clear and present danger facing our country, not only in these final days of the Trump Administration but in the weeks, months, and years that will follow.  It is about the necessity to demonstrate to this generation and to future generations the duty we share to protect our democracy every single day. “We do this today not for politics but to preserve and protect this great democracy.” Basically, Democrats (and some Republicans) see what happened on January 6, and Trump’s alleged involvement in it, as so reprehensible that it’s not enough to shrug their shoulders and say “well he’s gone now”. They say that without impeachment and conviction, what happened that day could happen again. Oh yeah. Members of Congress normally get a FISTFUL of tickets to hand out. One estimate I saw put the number close to 200,000 for a regular inauguration. This year, they’re only allowed one extra ticket because of the COVID-19 pandemic. That means there’ll be about 1,000 members of Congress and guests present. Nah, the impeachment process doesn’t interfere at all with Trump’s ability to issue pardons. He was already impeached (the first time) when he rattled off a heap of pardons before Christmas, after all. It’s *usually* a member of the Cabinet, but it doesn’t have to be! At Trump’s inauguration, the president pro tempore of the Senate was the designated survivor. That might be the case for Biden’s inauguration too, which would mean it would fall to Republican Senator Chuck Grassley. Nope. It was reported in US media that Trump’s inner circle had encouraged him to do so, but nothing has been confirmed. I imagine we’ll find out pretty soon after Biden’s inauguration if Trump has left a letter or not. Here are five of those letters from the past if you want to see what others have said. This service may include material from Agence France-Presse (AFP), APTN, Reuters, AAP, CNN and the BBC World Service which is copyright and cannot be reproduced. AEST = Australian Eastern Standard Time which is 10 hours ahead of GMT (Greenwich Mean Time)
See all stories on this topic

Make Politics Boring Again

Andrew P Street The new year is still looking awfully like 2020 Part II: The Suckening. I hate to b…
See all stories on this topic

‘Great British summer’: Matt Hancock cautions against booking holidays abroad – video

Guardian News · More videos · More videos on YouTube · more politics videos · Guardian News · More videos from · More videos from · Most popular.
See all stories on this topic

Trump Commission Says Identity Politics and 'Bitterness' Have Warped History Classes

Trump Commission Says Identity Politics and ‘Bitterness’ Have Warped History Classes

Betsy DeVos. Donald Trump. The Every Student Succeeds Act. Congress. State chiefs. School spending….
See all stories on this topic

India’s victory against divisive politics will come when everyday Hindus say enough

Important American events were pushed off stage by videos of the hideous January 6 bid to prevent the US Congress from certifying Biden’s victory. America’s response will be watched with interest, but a focus on what was removed from view is also called for. Only an hour or so before the Trump-incited attack occurred, Democrats had wrested control of the US Senate: Their nominee, Jon Ossoff, was projected as the winner in the final Georgia runoff. Then, a few hours after the attack, top Republicans in the Senate openly broke with Trump. Enlisting most of their party colleagues, they ensured certification. Both Kentucky’s Mitch McConnell, the Senate’s veteran leader, and South Carolina’s Lindsey Graham, until that moment Trump’s most persuasive ally, told the Senate that the Congress was obligated, by law and the facts, to certify Biden’s win. Frontally addressing Trump’s repeated falsehood that “thousands of dead men” and “thousands of felons” had voted for Biden, Graham said he had asked to see just 10 Biden votes from dead men or criminals. He hadn’t been shown even one. “Enough is enough,” Graham shouted in videos anyone can access, “Joe Biden will be the president and Kamala Harris the vice-president.” Possessing no role in auditing the vote, the Senate did not need this assertion. But, bombarded by Trump’s falsehoods, everyday Republicans across America required it. For true believers in Trump’s infallibility, men like Graham and McConnell no longer matter. They merely join those who should be “hanged”, a list that already includes vice-president Pence. However, frank reiteration of electoral facts helps others who voted Republican to accept the result and move on. Some Republicans are starting to express another political fact: Their party cannot expect to win future nationwide elections with only the white vote, which in percentage terms is steadily shrinking. In many individual constituencies, on the other hand, as also in several states taken as a whole, white supremacy remains an appealing message, and one which can be conveyed without using precise words. Like most other states of the American south, Georgia thus far was reliably “Red” (the Republican colour). Currently, the state’s electorate is 52 per cent white, 32 per cent Black, 10 percent Latino and 4.4 percent Asian. Jon Ossoff, a Jew, and Rev. Raphael Warnock, a Black preacher, defeated their Republican rivals because a crucial slice of the white vote plus an overwhelming share of the Black vote came to them. Black percentages are distinctly larger in the American South, which means that their political future should be bright if, while retaining Black support, Democrats can modestly widen their appeal among Whites and Latinos. Such a goal may not be beyond reach for people like Warnock, Ossoff and Stacey Abrams, the remarkable woman who has steadily bolstered Black voting and the Democratic Party in Georgia. The state has other strengths. For 33 years until his death last July, John Lewis, the civil rights hero possessing numerous white fans, represented a Georgia constituency in Washington. His autobiography reveals that Lewis had closely studied Gandhi and satyagraha in the 1950s and 1960s. Also closely connected to Georgia and its largest city, Atlanta, were Martin Luther King Jr. and his father. In fact, Warnock, the new senator, is the pastor at the Atlanta church where “Daddy” King and his more famous son had both served. In any long-term contest in the US between white supremacy and what King saw as his “beloved”, multiracial America, most observers would pick the latter to win. Still, the attack on the Capitol exposed an ugly reality, which is that some or many of the 74 million who voted for Trump (as against the 81 million for Biden) believe that whites own America. “This is our house,” attackers told the police as they forced their way into the Capitol with Confederate flags, Trump banners, guns, explosives, at least one noose, and “Jesus” placards. Without their permission, Blacks and other non-Whites should not enter or inhabit this house of theirs. Persons like Speaker Nancy Pelosi were trespassers. In India, Muslims, Dalits and Adivasis, taken together, form the equivalent of America’s Blacks. Counting Dalits and Adivasis in the Hindu fold, Hindu radicals reserve their public ire for Muslims. “Hindu consolidation” against Muslims is the political equivalent in India for the American call, open or subtle, for white supremacy. Who are the Hindu leaders who will speak frankly to India’s cow vigilantes or “love jihad” militants the way Pence, McConnell and Graham finally spoke on January 6 to America’s Trump backers? If “enough is enough” will not escape the lips of a Narendra Modi, an Amit Shah, an Adityanath or any principal colleague, everyday Hindus must utter the words, in their homes to kith and kin, outside their homes to fellow citizens. “India belongs as much to her Muslims, Sikhs, Christians, Jains, Buddhists, Parsis, Jews, atheists or others as to her Hindus.” With such words, Gandhi, Nehru and Ambedkar inspired free India to commence an impressive journey. Hindus unable or unwilling today to utter these words are India’s counterparts of the enablers of the January 6 attack on America’s core and constitutional meaning. But Kamala Harris, Raphael Warnock, Jon Ossoff and Stacey Abrams too have their Indian counterparts: Leaders from minority communities, and weaker castes, who feel connected also to other Indians, including caste Hindus and high-caste Hindus. When their voices ring out without fear, as also the voices of everyday Hindus offended by the coerciveness of Hindu supremacy, Indian Trumpism will find its nemesis. This article first appeared in the print edition on January 19, 2021, under the title “The Capitol lesson”. Gandhi is currently teaching at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 📣 The Indian Express is now on Telegram. Click here to join our channel (@indianexpress) and stay updated with the latest headlines Rajmohan GandhiThe writer is research professor at Centre for South Asian and Middle … read more
See all stories on this topic

Pankaja Munde: Need better representation of women in national politics

Stressing on the need for better representation of women in national politics, BJP national general…
See all stories on this topic

All Politics Are Local: Washington DC prepares for inauguration, impeachment proceedings on hold

All Politics Are Local: Washington DC prepares for inauguration, impeachment proceedings on hold

For more stories from Meyer and other reporters in our D.C. Bureau, visit wsav.com/washington. Be sure to tune in next week for “All Politics Are Local …
See all stories on this topic

Quentin Letts: Playing politics — isn’t it what politicians do?

A t the dispatch box we had the “welfare delivery” minister, one Will Quince; but it was anothe…
See all stories on this topic

Markus Fjortoft: Why can’t I have an opinion on politics? I despise that argument

Markus Fjortoft turned 27 last Tuesday. He has a bachelor’s degree in cultural anthropology from …
See all stories on this topic

A call for Israeli politics to return to core, humanistic values

A call for Israeli politics to return to core, humanistic values

Subscribe for our daily newsletter By subscribing I accept the terms of use…
See all stories on this topic

Contradictheory: The politics of social media

We all know that office politics can negatively impact office work. Just ask the 130 Malaysian government officers who were part of a 2013 Universiti …
See all stories on this topic

Prospect of Pardons in Final Days Fuels Market to Buy Access to Trump

The president’s allies have collected tens of thousands of dollars — and potentially much more …
See all stories on this topic

Trump tanks in approval rating, nears disapproval high: Real Clear Politics

Trump tanks in approval rating, nears disapproval high: Real Clear Politics

SARASOTA, Fla. (WWSB) – The latest RealClearPolitics chart showing the approval and disapproval rat…
See all stories on this topic

As tensions grow over vaccinations and politics, California lawmakers face threats from public

As tensions grow over vaccinations and politics, California lawmakers face threats from public. Lara Korte and Hannah Wiley Los Angeles Times (TNS) …
See all stories on this topic

Skipper: Respect in the era of politics as religion

Politics is a lot of things to a lot of people, but it is a lousy religion. Those who follow their particular political party religiously, be it Democrat, Republican …
See all stories on this topic