Comment by Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, on the … – TNLiveNews

Comment by Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, on the … – TNLiveNews

Consequences ‘dire’ if Human Rights Act ditched, more than 50 groups warn – The Guardian. 11 mins ago. Flash News …
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Mexican judge suspends bullfights in world’s largest ring | news.com.au

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White Ferns seamer Lea Tahuhu disappointed to hear of meeting with NZ Cricket through …

White Ferns seamer Lea Tahuhu only learned New Zealand Cricket wanted to meet with her in person through wife and team-mate Amy Satterthwaite. Tahuhu was one of five players not to have her White Ferns contract renewed for the coming year on Friday. She was informed last Wednesday she was not in New Zealand’s immediate plans and they would be looking to the future and the next generation of White Ferns. She described the past week for her and Satterthwaite as the roughest of their lives and said they were both ‘blind-sided’ by the news. Her axing from the national contract list comes a day after Satterthwaite, announced her retirement from international cricket after not receiving a contract herself. READ MORE: * White Ferns left to lick and tend wounds as they await World Cup death knell * White Ferns out to halt horror ODI trot when they meet England * White Ferns know they must do better as Women’s Cricket World Cup 2022 looms Despite missing the 17-player contract list, the 31-year-old Tahuhu has vowed to fight her way back into the White Ferns with strong performances for the Canterbury Magicians. Tahuhu and Satterthwaite had separate individual meetings last Wednesday in Christchurch with NZC’s high performance boss Bryan Stronach and chief executive David White. Finding out NZC wanted to meet with her through Satterthwaite, rather than receiving her own personal message had disappointed Tahuhu. “It’s an interesting one isn’t it. There’s not many other players this would happen to. I’m not sure if [White Ferns’ sisters] Amelia or Jess Kerr, if they were in a similar situation, just one of them would get a message. “I understand we’re married, but at the same time we are two separate people with two different careers and we’ve both given long service. It was a strange one to be told by Amy that I’d be having that meeting.” Tahuhu went into the meeting with a positive frame of mind and thought it may have been to discuss her cricket plans for the next year. She has been the White Ferns’ first-choice pace bowler in recent summers and was the leading wicket taker through the first half of the 2022 Women’s Cricket World Cup on home soil. She finished with 10 wickets at an average of 20.08 (economy rate 4.76), injuring her hamstring late in the tournament against England. Since debuting for the White Ferns in 2011, Tahuhu has been a regular in the side, playing 83 ODIs and 61 T20Is. Leigh Kasperek, Frankie Mackay and Thamsyn Newton were the other three players not to be retained, with Katey Martin having announced her retirement earlier this month. Six players have been offered contracts for the first time: Auckland Hearts trio Fran Jonas, Molly Penfold and Izzy Gaze, Northern Brave spinner Nensi Patel, Otago Sparks spinner Eden Carson and Wellington Blaze batter Georgia Plimmer. The past week had been incredibly challenging for both Tahuhu and Satterthwaite. Tahuhu praised the support of the New Zealand Cricket Players’ Association and chief executive Heath Mills and national personal development manager Lesley Elvidge. Family, friends, and cricket team-mates had also been superb. “I’d say it’s certainly been the roughest week of our lives. You never go into a meeting like that knowing what to expect. I guess we didn’t have a heap of information leading into it apart from being asked to attend it. It’s been really emotional. It’s been hard on us,” Tahuhu said. Discovering she wasn’t receiving a national contract and wasn’t seen as a “key T20 player’’ for the White Ferns had been a shock. The White Ferns have a busy schedule of T20 cricket looming over the next 12 months with July’s Commonwealth Games in Birmingham and the Women’s T20 World Cup in South Africa in February. “It’s really disappointing from my point of view, especially around the T20 line and the heavy diet [of matches]. I’ve worked extremely hard over the last 12 months to improve my batting and my power game for T20 cricket and felt I had a good Super Smash [domestic] series. “The most recent T20 game for the White Ferns [against India in Queenstown in February] I was player of the match. To be sat there and told, it’s hard to take. You respect what they’re doing and they’ve decided a change is needed and a different direction is going to be taken.” Tahuhu had bounced back from injuries and disappointing performances throughout her career and believed she still had a lot to contribute to the White Ferns. Her hunger and desire to play cricket at the elite level remained strong. She was looking at possible T20 franchise opportunities overseas and would be concentrating on off-season training with Canterbury. “I’ve come back before from numerous setbacks and this is just another one I’ll be looking to tackle and hopefully get back out there and play again for my country.” Tahuhu was saddened by the way Satterthwaite, a New Zealand women’s cricket great, had been treated and believed it could have been handled far better. After 15 years of international cricket, it was upsetting Satterthwaite had simply been told she wouldn’t be receiving a national contract and wasn’t in the White Ferns’ future plans. “I think that’s probably one of the things for her and for us as a family that has been hard to come to terms with is that she wasn’t even given the respect of a conversation of asking what her plans are for the next six-to-12 to-18 months… “You’d expect a bit of a conversation to have occurred, a two-way street, instead of being sat down and informed. “There’s a real sense not just among the players, but just the wider cricket community and to be fair, the cricket community around the world, that the whole situation with Amy could certainly have been handled in a better way.” Suzie Bates, Eden Carson, Sophie Devine, Lauren Down, Izzy Gaze, Maddy Green, Brooke Halliday, Hayley Jensen, Fran Jonas, Jess Kerr, Melie Kerr, Rosemary Mair, Jess McFadyen, Nensi Patel, Molly Penfold, Georgia Plimmer, Hannah Rowe.
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