Lotte Kopecky: Women no longer need to stop pro sports when they have a child – Cycling News

Lotte Kopecky: Women no longer need to stop pro sports when they have a child – Cycling News

‘A good sign for the future’ says Belgian Champion in reaction to Lizzie Deignan’s announcement of second pregnancy and contract extension through …
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For USWNT And Beyond In Women’s Sports, A Feeling Of Triumph As Equal Pay Settlement …

LYON, FRANCE – JULY 07: Megan Rapinoe of the USA celebrates following her sides victory in the 2019 … [+] FIFA Women’s World Cup France Final match between The United States of America and The Netherlands at Stade de Lyon on July 07, 2019 in Lyon, France. (Photo by Maja Hitij/Getty Images) The settlement between the U.S. Women’s National Team and U.S. Soccer has ramifications beyond just the $24 million in back pay and equalizing of prize money going forward between the women’s and men’s teams. It also cost Sue Bird, Megan Rapinoe’s fiancee and point guard for the Seattle Storm, some precious sleep as Rapinoe arose early to do some media hits about the years-in-the-making deal. “Yeah, I mean, my alarm clock went off at 2:30am as well,” Bird said during a media Zoom on Tuesday. “She had to be up there for those live hits. That was fun.” But all involved, Bird included, see the landmark agreement — pending a USWNT collective bargaining agreement with U.S. Soccer — as worth losing sleep over. “So what Megan and her teammates were able to do is amazing for themselves, yes,” Bird continued. “So they get the back pay… 10s of thousands of dollars in your pocket. That’s always wonderful. But what this does is, it’s going to change for the next generation and the generation after that… I don’t think she really realized like, the weight of it in the moment when it finally got done. But it’s starting to sink in and again, to circle back, this will be a moment that really changes things for women’s sports forever.” A few hours later, Rapinoe herself said the weight of it was starting to become clear to her. “The time and energy and the roller coaster, the unsuccessful mediations we will call them for sake of going forward together,” Rapinoe recalled, smiling now because she can. “…Just letting it sort of soak in from our perspective on how special this is and what an incredible group it took.” Remarkably, the group’s work, which took down a president — Carlos Cordeiro resigned under pressure in March 2020 over language in a U.S. Soccer filing during the lengthy equal pay dispute, reached this conclusion just days before Cordeiro was to face off against his successor, Cindy Parlow Cone, in an election on March 5. Cone was circumspect, but mentioned that she could “understand the frustration from being treated that way and dealing with my predecessor” during the media avail, along with the players, on Tuesday. “I’m very proud of the work that we’ve done and continue to do on equal pay,” Cone said. “And this is just one step towards rebuilding our relationship with a women’s team.” In case the internal structure of U.S. Soccer was disinclined to take the advice of the players and Cone alike — as Rapinoe, whose last name was mispronounced by Cordeiro at the 2019 celebration event for the U.S. winning the World Cup said, “I do think Carlos does know my last name, but he’s certainly not getting my vote, that’s for sure” — sponsors are weighing in ahead of the vote as well. But as Bird pointed out, this is a legacy that will extend long beyond any single presidential election. And Rapinoe’s younger teammates know it already.
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Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is causing ripples throughout the sports world – CBC

This is an excerpt from The Buzzer, which is CBC Sports’ daily email newsletter. Stay up to s…
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