Sadly Missed! Renowned Konkani litterateur CGS Taccode No More at 71 – Mangalorean.com

Sadly Missed! Renowned Konkani litterateur CGS Taccode No More at 71 – Mangalorean.com

Mangaluru: The blow was hard, the shock was severe when I got the news about the death of my dear friend CYRIL G SEQUEIRA fondly known as “CGS TACCODE”, this morning, Saturday 28 May 2022. Many of his fans and friends did not know his death was near, but God knew that he was suffering and the hills were hard to climb, so he closed his weary eyes and whispered “Peace be thine”. Many, who were close and dearer to him will miss him because he was warm and quick to make everyone feel comfortable, with his wit and jovial talk. If you look into my phone calls made from my mobile phone, there will be at least two to three calls made to him or he calls during the week. Plus we share some fun WhatsApp messages-but sadly No More. He would always help me in translating Konkani or Kannada captions into English for my articles or reports. And he never said no to any of my requests, and we always shared a few jokes and humour. CGS had a special way that warmed the hearts of everyone who knew him, and the qualities that made him the wonderful person he was, have left everyone with many beautiful memories. CGS did touch the hearts of many through his politeness, graciousness and friendliness. The last time that I saw the smiling face of CGS was a couple of weeks ago. Sadly, renowned Konkani litterateur, King of Konkani humour literature Cyril G Sequeira, aka ‘CGS Taccode’ passed away on Saturday 28 May at the age of 71. Born in Taccode, CGS did his schooling in Taccode, Moodbidri and Bengaluru. He started to write in Konkani when he was 12, and since then has been writing articles for FIVE decades. He was the sub-editor of Raknno weekly. Later he also worked as the editor of ‘Kannik’ and ‘Umallo’ Konkani periodicals. CGS, though has written in all forms of literature, was more known for his humorous writings. Novels to his credits are ‘Pattedarachem Sahas’, ‘Khunyegarachi Khun’, and ‘Sister Shobha’, and apart from them he also brought out many books which were collections of short stories, collections of poems, collection of humorous articles, plays, translated works, religious works, edited works etc. His humour books include ‘Fugettyo’, ‘Fokannam’, ‘Grahachar’, ‘Sursuryo’, ‘Kuchilyo’, ‘Maskiryo’, ‘Chirmulyo’, ‘Hi Hi Dubai’, ‘Bullbulle’, ‘Sullsulle’, ‘Tambddegulle’ and ‘Choklettam’. He has written many stageplays which include ‘Chyar Disancho Saunsar’, ‘Diana’ ‘Haschengi Rodchem?’ ‘Bhadyachi Bail’ ‘Gongo’ ‘Raan Dukor’ ‘Kutmacho Ters’ ‘Moinyachi Poili’ Tarik’ and ‘Mori Magdalen’. His collections of poetry are ‘Izmolachi Vattli’ and ‘Kulkulo’. He also had done various editing work for Konkani publications. CGS had also compered many social and musical programmes of leading Konkani composers. He had also participated in many ‘Kavi Sammelan’ in and around Mangaluru. He was conferred awards by Konkani Basha Mandal, Goa, Karnataka Konkani Sahitya Academy, Sandesha, Konkani Kutam Bahrain, and received Konkani Sahitya Academy Honorary Award. Having worked in Doha Qatar and Dubai for a few years, he came to his hometown for good. He is survived by his wife Sylvia and children Vijesh and Vijetha and their families. About CGS, there was more—a hint of joyfulness and fun, a sense of self-confidence, an unmistakable kindness. It was the kind of smile that drew people to him. That smile was there the first time I met him a couple of years ago and that smile was still there the last time I saw him a couple of weeks ago. He didn’t express any feelings or signs of health issues. If anything, everyone would agree with me that his personality and smile was brighter and more joyous than the last time we all saw him. SADLY MISSED-MAY HIS SOUL REST IN PEACE! Like this:Like Loading… Spread the loveTweet
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Kids of the pandemic: Humourless, aggressive and touchy | Deccan Herald

Lost sense of humour, poor concentration, aggression, indiscipline, emotional outbursts, tendency to lie, hypersensitivity and no interest in studies are some of the behavioural changes that teachers are noticing in children ever since schools opened on May 16. Even those in the 13-14 age group have lost their sense of humour, say teachers witnessing the toll of the pandemic on children. Veena Rao, who teaches at an unaided school in southern Bengaluru, narrated an incident that left her shocked. “Almost 80 per cent of the kids in Class 7 were impassive when I cracked a joke,” she said. “I have been in this profession for 11 years now but never found the children this detached.” A teacher from another school explained how kids have become emotional. Citing a recent example, the teacher said, “We were conducting creative activities in the school just to make them comfortable in the class. One boy started crying when his turn came. His parents later told us that he behaves the same way at home.” Nagasimha G Rao, director of NGO Child Rights Trust, said their helpline (Child Line 1098) was receiving phone calls from parents about similar behavioural changes in their wards. He reiterated the demand for conducting mandatory counselling in schools in the aftermath of Covid-19. D Shashi Kumar, general secretary of the Associated Managements of Primary and Secondary Schools in Karnataka, corroborated this, saying teachers are noticing major behavioural changes in children, and parents are helpless. “Kids have become restless and parents are unable to control them because there are too many behavioural issues. Even inside the classroom, teachers are finding it difficult to handle them as there are a lot of attention deficit issues,” he explained. To address the problem, some schools are training teachers while others are counselling the children. Dr Anupama S, a child psychologist who visits a few schools in Bengaluru, attributed the phenomenon to the pandemic. “Age-related behavioural changes are common. But what we are witnessing now has a lot to do with the pandemic. Lack of friends, exposure to gadgets, lack of physical activities, increased screen time and no access to the outside world… kids have been under stress for almost two years now,” she said, adding that teachers and schools should handle kids with care and conduct regular counselling sessions for both students and parents.
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‘Johnny Depp has dark sense of humour’: lawyer defends ‘Let’s burn Amber’ text

Johnny Depp’s lawyer Camille Vasquez said that the actor has ‘dark sense of humour’ in efforts t…
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