Six reasons why you should date a Scot – Daily Record

Six reasons why you should date a Scot – Daily Record

Though we might not all be lucky enough to be born Scottish, or have Scottish blood, we can always …
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Crown Solicitor Brian Dickey to step down | Stuff.co.nz

Auckland Crown Solicitor Brian Dickey is stepping down from his role as head of prosecutions to head out on his own. Dickey has held the role for eight years and led the prosecution team which saw Jesse Kempson convicted for the murder of Grace Millane. More recently he led the prosecution team against Eli Epiha who murdered Constable Matthew Hunt. In a statement from Meredith Connell, Dickey says he will step down in the summer and join the independent bar. READ MORE: * Grace Millane murder trial: British backpacker’s family arrive at Auckland court to face alleged killer * Grace Millane murder trial: The key players in court * Meredith Connell’s Brian Dickey wins Auckland Crown Solicitor role He will remain the Crown solicitor, overseeing criminal prosecutions in the Auckland area, until a new appointment is made. “None of us who prosecute serious crime at [Meredith Connell] and the other Crown Solicitor offices ever forget the victims and whānau, who open up to us in private and in open court about the harm suffered by them or their loved ones from violent and other serious crimes.” Dickey began at Meredith Connell in 1994 before becoming a partner of the firm in 2000. He prosecuted his first murder two years later. His career has also included the prosecution of finance company bosses, following the Global Financial Crisis. He prosecuted Bridgecorp’s Rod Petricevic as well as other Serious Fraud Office cases, such as Nathans FInance and Dominion Finance. Dickey replaced Simon Moore and acting Crown Solicitor Christine Gordon when they were made High Court judges. Known for his sharp and dry humour, Dickey says he intends to go into “white collar regulatory law … but make up something glamorous”. Dickey says he made the decision because he still has plenty of years left to pursue a career at the bar. The timing was also good for the firm which is in good hands with solid talent coming through and a healthy culture. He says he would have left sooner but didn’t want to go while the courts were struggling with getting things back on track, post-lockdown. Dickey’s friend and colleague, David Johnstone, has also recently left the firm to joining the independent bar.
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The Society of Woeful Super-Villains: Issue 2 | ThePeterboroughExaminer.com

This copy is for your personal non-commercial use only. To order presentation-ready copies of Toron…
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