Study finds higher rates of advanced thyroid cancer in California

Study finds higher rates of advanced thyroid cancer in California

LOS ANGELES A new University of California, Los Angeles study has found that in parts of California…
See all stories on this topic

U.S. sales of antibiotics for food animals rose over six years: FDA

CHICAGO U.S. sales of medically important antibiotics approved for use in livestock rose by 23 perc…
See all stories on this topic

Big plans for health service ‘revolution’

Johannesburg – A massive revolution is set to completely change the face of the health delivery system if the ideals of the White Paper on the National Health Insurance (NHI) come to pass. The White Paper promises to rope everyone in the country into the funding system, to ensure the highest level of health care is available to all. Health Minister Dr Aaron Motsoaledi on Friday released aspects of the White Paper. “It will be an ultra-marathon, not a sprint, which will be delivered over a 14-year-period,” he said. The period of implementation will be broken into two five-year periods plus one four-year period. It’s estimated the NHI will cost R225 billion by 2025 and and it’s expected to be funded through a payroll levy for all employed South Africans, an increase in VAT, or an income tax surcharge. It will be compulsory for all citizens. Medical aids are to offer only top-up cover for services not available under the NHI. Motsoaledi said the major thrust of the NHI is to ensure provision of quality health care to everyone, no matter their social standing or their income. “People will be classified according to their health needs, and no one will be left to die on the side of the road by any ambulance – public or private,” he said. He spoke about affordability for the fund, which he said could cost anything up to R1 trillion if not planned for accordingly. “What it costs will depend entirely on how we all design it,” he said. But Motsoaledi could “dream on” as there is “zero chance” of a National Health Insurance being affordable for the country in the wake of the economic carnage that has followed the axing of Nhlanhla Nene as finance minister, according to economist Dr Iraj Abedian. The debt-service costs as a proportion of the budget are already running north of 11 percent. “It was the fastest-growing item of the budget. “And the revenue from taxes is not coming in because the economy is not performing, cost of debt is rising and it’s a tough situation. The minister can dream on,” Abedian added. * Additional reporting by Craig Dodds Saturday Star * Use IOL’s Facebook and Twitter pages to comment on our stories. See links below. Get our free IOL newsletters – subscribe here… IOL on Twitter IOL News on Facebook Related Stories
See all stories on this topic