Trackhouse Entertainment Group announces PROJECT91 initiative – Yahoo! Sports

Trackhouse Entertainment Group announces PROJECT91 initiative – Yahoo! Sports

CONCORD, N.C. — Trackhouse Entertainment Group today announced the creation of PROJECT91, a program designed to expand its international reach by …
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Cannes 2022: Splendid reception for India’s All That Breathes, Pakistan’s Joyland

It can happen only in the movies. Two films, very different from each other, received a splendid reception at the 75th edition of the Cannes Film Festival. The standing ovation at the end of ‘Joyland’, Pakistan’s first official entry, was heartwarming; and Shaunak Sen’s terrific documentary ‘All That Breathes’, which screened immediately after, was as much of a celebration.premiumRarely does the Cannes Film Festival select a film which has already played in a major festival before (‘All That Breathes’ had not only screened but won an award at the Sundance Film Festival earlier in 2022). In an email exchange in March, Sen had confided that the film had been selected at a ‘top European festival in May’, and here he is, with his cast, enjoying the fruits of their most excellent labour of love. There’s a striking similarity in the multiple ways people in India and Pakistan hanker for male children and stroke patriarchal egos. Men and women are strictly confined to gender roles, and anyone trying to break out is punished for their transgression. Saim Sadiq’s moving film opens with a woman (Sarwat Gilani) emerging from labour, teary-eyed by the news that it is a girl. Yet again. This makes it her fourth daughter, and both her husband, and her father-in-law are in lament mode; it is only her brother in law Haider (Ali Junejo) who sees her pain, and understands it deeply. Each of these men as fathers and husbands and brothers offer a sharp comment on masculinity. What happens if someone is gender fluid? Where does he or she go? Joyland’s little family through which all of this plays out feels familiar, even though you may never have been to Lahore. The father, confined to a wheelchair, still runs his household through iron control. The older son (Sohail Sameer) is counting the days till his wife begets a son. Younger son Haider is on the lookout for a job, and his wife Mumtaz (Rasti Farooq) goes out to work, a role reversal whose roots we get to know about much later in the movie. Sadiq, born and raised in the city and now living in the US, had created a vivid world of trans-dancers in his short ‘Darling’. In ‘Joyland’, he expands on that universe, exploring the connections between those who live in ‘respectable neighbourhoods’ and that of pockets of public entertainment with their mostly male patrons. Transwoman Biba (Alina Khan) stands on the periphery: when she is performing, along with her dancers, she brings these same men joy; outside of the stage, she becomes an object of contempt. The growing closeness between Haider and Biba reveals ingrained attitudes: how much of a change can a sex-change operation bring? Haider’s own sexual imprint, never clearly mentioned, makes him the butt of many limp-wristed jokes. The power dynamics between these two, as they struggle to navigate their worlds, make for the beating heart of the movie. The dark skies of Delhi, especially when the air goes from the merely viscous to most foul, is harmful not just to the humans but also to the kites which circle above the mounds of rubbish on the outskirts of the city, looking for sustenance. Sen’s ‘All That Breathes’ feels like a short-haul journey into dystopia. It is a testament to the durable aspects of India’s capital: both its marginalised humans, battered by inhumane laws, and its majestic kites have learned to navigate their environment, seeking out sympathetic pockets. Brothers Nadeem Shehzaad and Mohammed Saoud, and their helper Salik, tend to injured kites, and other creatures, in their basement. It is crowded by rusted metal parts, as meat to feed the birds is grinded out in a machine that is falling to bits. It is a world like no other, in which these injured birds learn to submit to human hands which are raised only to heal. We worry about all that breathes, says one of the brothers, and instantly that statement feels like balm, especially in these polarised, inimical times. In one of those moments which can happen through sheer happenstance, a young man and a young kite look at each other. Their eyes lock, and we know that they are helping each other out. The bird will fly again, and the young man will find the purpose he seeks. 🗞 Subscribe Now: Get Express Premium to access our in-depth reporting, explainers and opinions 🗞️ Shubhra GuptaShubhra Gupta is film critic and senior columnist with the Indian Expr… read more
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Super RTL launches TOGGO kids entertainment platform – Digital TV Europe

Leading German children’s entertainment provider Super RTL has launched a new streaming platform…
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